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Welcome Address
Wed, 8:30am - 9:00am

Dara Baldwin, MPA, Senior Public Policy Analyst, National Disability Rights Network

Born in Torrejon, Spain to parents involved in serving their country, the desire to serve has continued through her life. Currently, Ms. Baldwin is the Senior Public Policy Analyst for the National Disability Rights Network (NDRN) in Washington, DC. NDRN is the nonprofit membership organization for the federally mandated Protection and Advocacy Systems and Client Assistance Programs, the largest provider of legally based advocacy services to people with disabilities in the US.
Ms. Baldwin works on NDRN’s diversity and cultural competency team and is responsible for outreach as well as working on coalitions to assist with better legislative outcomes for the community. She has extensive knowledge of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and other disability laws. She has a keen ability for networking and outreach to grassroots national and international advocates, and she has led multiple national and international advocacy campaigns. Ms. Baldwin worked on 11 bills that passed in Congress and were signed by President Barack Obama during his term in office.
Ms. Baldwin holds a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from Rutgers University, Newark, NJ and was a Pi Alpha Alpha honors Graduate with a Masters of Public Administration from Rutgers University the School of Public Affairs and Administration, Newark, NJ. She believes that it is her duty to move forward with her career goals and at the same time, create a pathway for others. Follow: @NJDC07 

Keynote Address Slides

Breakout Sessions Track One
Wed, 9:20am - 10:50am

A1: Housing For Better Health: A Medicaid Transformation Demonstration Implementation Update
The federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services approved Washington’s application for a 5-year Medicaid Transformation Demonstration in January 2017. This demonstration includes a new, targeted supportive housing services Medicaid benefit (now called Community Transition Services and Foundational Community Supports). Join this session for an update from the state on the implementation of this new benefit. 

Presentation Slides:
Jon Brumback
Melanie Pazolt
Pat Tucker

Presenters:
Jon Brumbach, Senior Health Policy Analyst, Washington State Health Care Authority  
Jon Brumbach joined the Health Care Authority in 2015 as a Senior Health Policy Analyst, working on health care policy related to social determinants of health. Jon has focused primarily on the Medicaid Transformation Demonstration and the targeted supportive housing and supported employment benefits. 

Melodie Pazolt, Supported Employment/Supportive Housing Program Administrator, Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery, Washington State Department of Social and Health Services
Ms. Melodie Pazolt has over 25 years experience in community rehabilitation with people with mental illness and people with developmental disabilities. She has operated 15 independent grants and contracts, direct services to consumers of mental health services, and has managed the activities of a core mental health funded employment program. She formerly was the manager of the Columbia River Mental Health Services Clearview Employment Program. At Columbia River Mental Health she supervised over 30 full time staff who operate mental health employment programs, welfare to work programs, mental health, developmental disability, vocational rehabilitation, Workforce Investment Act contract services, and multiple federal grants serving youth and adults with disabilities, as well as individuals who are homeless. Prior to her position at DSHS-DBHR, she worked for the Clark County Department of Community Services as the Consumer and Stakeholder Affairs Manager. Ms. Pazolt is currently the Supported Employment/Supported Housing Program Administrator for the Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery services. Ms. Pazolt brings an understanding of not only the issues that face individuals with psychiatric disorders, but an overall understanding of the various systems that may be involved in that person’s life.

Pat Tucker, MBA, MA, Senior Program Manager, Advocates for Human Potential, Inc.
Ms. Pat Tucker is a nationally-recognized leader in supportive housing, supported employment, and community integration for people with disabilities, including those with behavioral health conditions. Her diverse career has fashioned a unique perspective on employment for people with disabilities, job development, permanent supportive housing, and supported employment management. She has been a job coach, job developer, and has created employment programs that have been nationally recognized as innovative and effective in securing employment for people from all backgrounds. Before joining Advocates for Human Potential, Inc. (AHP), Ms. Tucker spent more than 20 years supervising affordable housing programs. Realizing that housing alone did not cure homelessness, she added employment programs to all of the housing programs that she managed. Operated mostly by staff with lived experience of homelessness, these programs found job for hundreds of clients.                                            
As a Senior Program Associate and one of AHP’s top trainers, Ms. Tucker’s professional experiences and creative spirit produce a training style that is concise, easily followed, worthwhile, and fun. She brings a passion to her trainings and successfully takes difficult, complex subjects and transforms them into information everyone can enjoy. Regardless of the topic, people attending Ms. Tucker’s trainings gain a deeper, fuller, and clearer understanding of the content area and the skills necessary to complete related tasks with greater confidence and effectiveness. 

 

CANCELLED A2: Homelessness And Barriers To Offender Reentry  
People with felony convictions frequently rely on social service organizations to provide affordable housing opportunities. When stably housed in permanent supportive or transitional housing, recidivism rates for people with all conviction types decrease dramatically. This session will discuss strategies to help people with felony convictions access housing. 

Presenters:
Joseph Field, MSW, Special Populations Program Manager, The STAR Project
Joseph Field, Sr. is the Special Populations Program Manager at The Successful Transition and Reentry (STAR) Project in Walla Walla, Washington. Mr. Field graduated from Walla Walla Community College with an AA/transfer degree with Honors in June of 2012. He graduated from Walla Walla University with a Bachelor of Sociology degree in 2015 and is currently pursuing his master's degree[b]. Mr. Field has prior knowledge of the criminal justice system. His interest of study is with this population and the fields of sociology and social welfare. Mr. Field has been in recovery since May of 2008 and has a passion for helping people with felony convictions who are experiencing oppression. In his spare time - when not studying for school or helping people - he likes to spend time volunteering with his kids in the many sports they play, in addition to doing supplemental research in subjects such as mass incarceration, race, and class status. 

Becky Turner, Executive Director, The STAR Project                                
Becky Turner is the Executive Director of The Successful Transition and Reentry (STAR) Project in Walla Walla, Washington. A graduate of Walla Walla Community College and Washington State University, Becky is a K-8 certified public school teacher. Her experiences as a teacher give her a unique perspective in working with people experiencing challenges, including people experiencing homelessness and families in crisis. An eclectic personality born and bred in the Walla Walla valley, Becky enjoys crocheting with her grandmother, weekly Sunday dinners with her extended family, playing the piano, organic gardening, and writing mystery dinner theater scripts. 

 

A3: Diversion Crash Course And Interactive Workshop  
This session will provide a crash course on how Pierce County innovatively implemented "diversion" using a client-centered strength based approach in having creative problem solving conversations with individuals and families as they seek housing services. Learn what it looks like to give power back to clients as well as the skills needed to make this happen in your community.

Presentation Slides

Presenters:
Tammy Boros, BA, Associated Ministries of Tacoma Pierce County
Tammy Boros graduated from Western Washington University with a Bachelor of Psychology degree. She worked at Greater Lakes Mental Healthcare for 12 years, and her primary focus was in crisis work and discharge planning from hospitals. She has been with Associated Ministries since 2011 and works as a Housing Program Manager with Access Point for Housing/ Coordinated Entry.

Alan Brown, BA, Housing Services Director, Catholic Community Services of Western Washington
Alan Brown has worked for Catholic Community Services for 25 years and has been Director of Housing Services for 10 years. He oversees multiple housing projects, which include Permanent Supportive Housing, Rapid Re-Housing, SSVF, Shelter Network, and Coordinated Entry/Diversion. His compassion, enthusiasm, and genuine belief that everyone deserves a place to live has helped all of these projects thrive.

Will Gorbaty, BA, Coordinated Entry Specialist, Catholic Community Services of Western Washington
Will Gorbaty was born and raised in Tacoma, attended Stadium High School, and went on to graduate from Western Washington University with an interdisciplinary degree in Politics, Economics, and Philosophy in 2013. Will has worked with Catholic Community Services since graduating—first as a Program Specialist with Homeless Adult Services, assisting with the day-to-day operations at the adult shelters, and then as a Rapid Re-Housing Case Manager. Will has been working as a Coordinated Entry Specialist for over a year, spending his days meeting with individuals and families experiencing homelessness to plan and problem solve immediate housing solutions to exit homelessness and access stable housing. Will likes to spend his free time with friends and family, and he has a passion for sports of all kinds.

Angela Thompson, BA, Coordinated Entry Specialist Team Lead, Associated Ministries of Tacoma Pierce County
Angela Thompson has been working with people experiencing homelessness for 6 years. She has worked in management at both domestic violence and family shelters and has been pivotal to the development of diversion services as a unique approach in Pierce County. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Human Services from Western Washington University and is currently pursuing a Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology with a focus on Marriage and Family Therapy. 

 

A4: Program Rules: The Good, The Bad And The Ugly  
Excessive rules to maintain ‘compliance’ within a program often become barriers to success. Last year, we explored eliminating program rules in order to foster a less disciplinary and more trauma-informed approach to housing programs. This year, we will focus on how to work with staff and clients in programs with minimal rules. Providers will talk about their experience eliminating rules and the consequences. Hint: The shelter did NOT burn down.

Presentation Slides

Presenters:
Emily Burgess, BA, Program Manager, Washington State Department of Commerce
Emily Burgess joined the Housing Assistance Unit at the Department of Commerce in early 2013 to provide technical assistance and training for HMIS users. She joined the Consolidated Homeless Grant team as a program manager in 2014. Prior to working at Commerce, Emily worked directly with families experiencing homelessness as a shelter manager in beautiful Lewis County Washington. 

Cody Francis, Assistant Director, Family Crisis Network
Cody Francis is the Assistant Director at Family Crisis Network, Pend Oreille County’s only provider of housing and victim’s services. Cody began volunteering as a domestic violence, sexual assault, and homeless advocate in 1996 and was hired as a full time advocate in January of 1997. Her passion has always been journalism and computers (when they became available) which comes in handy in her small, rural agency. Today, most of Cody’s responsibilities lie with serving people who are experiencing homelessness and those who are at risk of becoming homeless. Family Crisis Network operates two shelter facilities and one transitional housing facility.

Danielle Rylander, CBD, CCBE, Case Manager, Crossroad Housing
Danielle Rylander has worked with Crossroads Housing, formerly known as Mason County Shelter, in Mason County since 2013. In 2016, Danielle was nominated by her agency to join Team Enterprise of Mason County in the 100-Day Challenge to End Family Homelessness. Since then, she has worked tirelessly on implementing a functional Coordinated Entry System in Mason County. Danielle currently continues her work as a Housing Case Manager specializing in program development. 

Schelli Slaughter, BA, Executive Director, Family Support Center of South Sound
Schelli Slaughter is the Executive Director of the Family Support Center of South Sound, a nonprofit collaborative "one stop" multi service agency located in downtown Olympia, Washington. The Family Support Center of South Sound provides comprehensive supportive services, advocacy, resources, coordinated entry, shelter, and housing to families, children, and survivors of domestic violence. Schelli has worked in the homeless and affordable housing field for over 13 years at every organizational level and understands firsthand the joys and challenges faced by direct service providers, administrators, and board members in implementing best practices into program policies and services. 

 

A5: How A Public Housing Authority Can Make Itself More Accessible And Relevant To People Who Are Homeless
Housing authorities are a community’s largest source of housing dollars. Yet they can be inaccessible to people who are homeless, including homeless youth without families. This session will discuss how housing authorities can become more accessible and will review the importance of intention, flexibility, partnerships, and challenges.

Presenters:
Michael Mirra, Executive Director, Tacoma Housing Authority
Michael Mirra is the Executive Director of the Tacoma Housing Authority (THA) in Tacoma, WA. He has served in that position since 2004. Before that, he served for two years as THA’s general counsel. Prior to joining THA, Michael practiced law for about 25 years with Columbia Legal Services in Washington State and legal services in Tennessee representing people living on low incomes and organizations in civil matters. His areas of practice included litigation in state and federal courts, class action litigation, the law governing fair housing, growth management, federal housing programs, housing policy, landlord-tenant relations, nonprofit governance, juvenile and mental health commitment, child welfare services, and issues related to children who are homeless. Michael graduated from the University of Chicago and Vanderbilt Law School. He grew up in Queens.

Stephen Norman, Executive Director, King County Housing Authority         
Stephen Norman is the Executive Director of the King County Housing Authority (KCHA), which serves all of King County outside of the cities of Seattle and Renton.  The Authority owns over 9,500 units of housing and provides financial assistance to an additional 10,000 households renting from private landlords. Stephen Norman has an extensive background in community organizing, urban planning and affordable housing design, development and management. He served as an Assistant Housing Commissioner for New York City during the Koch and Dinkins administrations and subsequently helped create the Corporation for Supportive Housing (CSH) as its original vice-president. He holds a MA in Public Administration and an appointment as a Loeb Fellow at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design. He is currently president of the Council of Large Public Housing Authorities and chair of the Board of CSH. Stephen Norman served as co-chair of King County’s Inter-agency Council on Homelessness from 2005 to 2014, as a Board Member of Building Changes for over a decade, and as a member of the Advisory Board for the Washington Families Fund.

 

A6: Organizing Local Tenant Rights Campaigns                                        
This session will cover a variety of tenant rights issues and the discriminatory acts that seek to undermine the rights of vulnerable populations and protected classes. Hear from organizers working to pass local tenant protection legislation and strategize around starting a campaign of your own!

Presentation Slides

Presenters:
Terri Anderson, Spokane Community Organizer, Tenants Union of Washington
A tireless advocate for issues affecting the underrepresented communities in Spokane, Terri organized affected members of the Spokane community for the unanimous passage of a city ordinance to mandate independent investigations of police misconduct. Terri has organized to address the affects of years of uranium mining on the Spokane Indian Reservation, and has worked for racial equity in higher education. Terri’s life as a first generation American, fourth generation Washingtonian, a person of color living in Spokane, a tenant, and as an advocate as well as her passion and commitment to social, economic, and environmental justice drives her work to make Spokane a better place for everyone to live and make a difference.

Helena Benedict, Tenant Counselor, Tenants Union of Washington
Helena Benedict is a tenant educator and organizer with the Tenants Union of Washington. She has deep family roots in Western Washington and lives in the Beacon Hill neighborhood of Seattle. She dreams of cities that take care of their own and value community over developers’ profits, and sees the right to housing as a vital manifestation of struggles for racial, economic, and environmental justice and resistance. Helena also organizes with the groups LGBTQ Allyship and the Committee in Solidarity with the People of El Salvador.

Dinah Braccio, Tenant Counselor, Tenants Union of Washington
Dinah is a Tenant Educator and Community Organizer with the Tenants Union of Washington State where she has been working for the past 2 years. Before coming to the Tenants Union, she worked in a volunteer capacity with Gender Justice League and J Street U.

Reverend Jimmie James, MA, Executive Director and Nonprofit Leadership Consultant, B.E.S.T.
Throughout his 20 years in nonprofit leadership, social justice advocacy, and ministry, Reverend James has developed, implemented, and led a number of successful social justice campaigns and projects, advocating for marginalized communities and social change, locally and nationally. He has a strong emphasis on developing community capacity, equity, and involvement of the Black community and poor people living in poverty in Kent and South King County. He has been a consultant, trainer, facilitator, and speaker with faith communities across the state, the Washington State Prevention Summit, the City of Kent, and organizations nationally on program development addressing issues of poverty, youth, education, and justice. Recently in the 2016 legislative session he was was one of the leaders who helped author and advocate a bill, SHB 2791, establishing a Statewide Reentry Council that was passed into law May. This council created the community component to assist the department of Corrections in strategies and planning for successful transition and reentry for former prisoners

 

 

A7: Part I: Intersection Between Race, Class, And Homelessness    
This interactive and experiential workshop will explore the critical link between race and class. Participants should be prepared to examine their own class backgrounds and racial identities. The workshop will consider how issues of class and race affect our common work in homeless services and advocacy.

Please note this is a two-part workshop. Part II (Session A15) will be limited to participants who attended Part I (Session A7).

Presentation Slides

Presenters:
Anita Garcia Morales, Senior Trainer, Class Action
Anita Garcia Morales received her BA and teaching degree from the University of Washington. After over twenty years as a classroom teacher in Seattle Public Schools (SPS), she moved to the district office where she developed and facilitated equity and race professional development for teachers and administrators for the last ten years of a 35-year career with SPS. In addition to being a Senior Trainer with Class Action, Anita also facilitates Courage and Renewal Circles of Trust, teaches Positive Discipline parent/guardian workshops, delivers equity and race training, is an instructor for the Seattle Teacher Residency Program, and has co-facilitated a cross-class retreat series. The common thread that runs through all that Anita does is her focus on social justice and equity.

Alan Preston, Managing Director, Real Change
Alan Preston is the Managing Director for Real Change Homeless Empowerment Project where he has worked for six years. Alan has committed his career to advocating for economic justice and using his privilege to challenge economic inequality. Alan is also a Senior Trainer with Class Action, a nonprofit whose mission is to inspire action to end classism. Alan has designed and facilitated programs on class for progressive foundations, giving circles, churches, and nonprofit organizations. He holds an MBA from the J.L. Kellogg Graduate School of Management and a BA in political science from Haverford College.

 

A8: Taming The Dragon: Trauma Informed Self Care    
Taming the Dragon is a groundbreaking, self-care training seminar, for social service providers and for anyone who has experienced addiction, violence, poverty, homelessness, and other adversities. Trauma Informed Care is at the center of this training, exploring how our personal trauma informs how we care for others, as well as how we care for ourselves. 

Presenter:
Rebekah Demirel, LAc, RAc, MPCC, Trauma Specialist, Trauma Integration Programs
Rebekah Demirel is the founder and director of Trauma Integration Programs. Rebekah has more than a decade of experience as an ambulance paramedic, twenty-two years of experience as a paramedic trainer, and fifteen years of mental health counseling experience specializing in post-traumatic stress and critical incident stress (licensed in British Columbia). She is also a licensed East Asian medicine practitioner and acupuncturist, practicing in Seattle, Washington and Victoria, BC. Rebekah’s unique skill set and experience are informed by her own traumatic childhood and teen years spent on the street and in the foster care system, giving her a special familiarity and empathy for trauma and loss. She serves on the planning council for Seattle King County Healthcare for the Homeless and is an active and fierce volunteer advocate for people who are homeless and underprivileged.

 

Breakout Sessions Track Two
Wed, 11:10am - 12:25am

A9: Mission Possible: Lessons From The Bumpy Road Of Creating A 24/7 Low Barrier Shelter In Spokane  
This session will cover lessons learned from expanding services at the House of Charity to create a no barrier 24/7 shelter response in Spokane. Key points include: addressing barriers, scaling up staffing and programs, and maintaining health and safety for everyone in the shelter.

Presenters:
Samantha Dompier, MSW, Director of the House of Charity, Catholic Charities of Spokane
Sam Dompier is the Director at the House of Charity, the largest low-barrier shelter in Spokane, serving over 3,000 people each year. Sam holds a Master of Social Work degree from Eastern Washington University and has a background in case management and grant administration. Currently, she is working collaboratively with the City of Spokane to expand the services offered at the House of Charity to be open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and to serve adults and youth over the age of 18.

Heather Schleigh, Assistant Director of the House of Charity, Catholic Charities of Spokane 
Heather Schleigh is the Assistant Director at the House of Charity, the largest low-barrier shelter in Spokane, serving over 3,000 people each year. Heather's degree is in social services and business administration and has an extensive background in case management, property management, and project management. Currently, Heather is working collaboratively with the City of Spokane to expand the services offered at the House of Charity to be open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and to serve adults and youth over the age of 18.

 

A10: Building In Safety Nets To Prevent And Address Youth Homelessness  
Learn about the systematic barriers that youth face in accessing services and how Cocoon House tailors their programs to ensure the needs of every youth and family are met. We will have representatives from housing, outreach, and prevention represented for an interactive presentation and panel discussion for peer learning. 

Presentation Slides

Presenters:        
Shira Hasson-Schiff, MA, Director of Prevention, Cocoon House
Shira Hasson-Schiff has been working with youth and families since 2004. She has a Master’s of Applied Behavioral Science and has extensive experience in teaching and facilitation. She has presented on the Cocoon House Prevention model at multiple national conferences on homelessness and has led webinars on the topic. She teaches parenting classes for parents across the Snohomish County community who are struggling with their teenagers. Before coming to Cocoon House, Shira helped create a program providing high fidelity wraparound services to homeless youth across King County. In addition to running the Prevention Department, Shira provides clinical support to all Cocoon House housing programming.

Elysa Hovard, MNLP, Director of Outreach, Cocoon House
Elysa Hovard has spoken on many national platforms and conferences on youth homelessness. She has five years of experience facilitating trainings. She has presented many times at the Family and Youth Services Bureau’s Annual Runaway Homeless Youth Conference as well as other local conferences.

 

A11: Medication Assisted Treatment: Myths, Facts, And The New Reality  
Addiction and treatment are complicated issues, recovery is sometimes fleeting and elusive, yet millions of people find recovery that looks as different as the people who achieve it. This session will explore some characteristics of Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT). We will provide you with information and resources to help you better understand and increase support of individuals with an opioid use disorder who are in need of or already receiving MAT.

Presentation Slides

Presenters:
Asif Khan, MD, SAP, FASAM, FACP, Founder and CEO, Northwest Integrated Health
Dr. Asif Khan is the founder and CEO of Northwest Integrated Health (NWIH). NWIH provides a patient centered and integrated health model for individuals with an opioid-use-disorder in Pierce County. NWIH operates treatment centers in Puyallup, Tacoma, and Lakewood. Dr. Khan is a board-certified addiction specialist; earned his medical degree from The Aga Khan University Medical College in Pakistan; and completed a three-year residency in Internal Medicine from University of Illinois, Chicago. Dr. Khan also has training in toxicology, Infectious disease, wound care management, and hyperbaric medicine. 

Thomas J. Fuchs MEd, Behavioral Health Adult Treatment Manager, Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery, Washington State Department of Social and Health Services
Thomas Fuchs is the Behavioral Health Adult Treatment Manager at DSHS-Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery (DBHR). He is involved in many projects at DBHR, including development and training related to secure detoxification facilities (HB 1713) for individuals in involuntary commitment.  Other projects include SAMSHA grants that deliver Naloxone, Washington Screening Brief Intervention Referral to Treatment-Primary Care Integration (WASBIRT-PCI), and most recently, the State Targeted Response (STR) grant addressing opioid use disorders. He also works with DBHR staff to assess and encourage treatment centers to develop capacity to provide dual-diagnosis treatment.
Prior to his work at DBHR he owned a consulting business (Halcyon Consulting LLC) that mostly focused on developing Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) in traditionally oriented treatment centers. Tom also has experience in grant writing, program development, facilitation/mediation and training, and has worked as a treatment center director for 14 years in both Wisconsin and Minnesota.  

 

A12: Not Your High School Math: Using Data To Improve Homelessness Services
Being data-driven is foundational to good system design, but how exactly do you do that?!  This workshop guides you through statewide data about unsheltered households and pushes you to decide what is working and what has got to go to serve more unsheltered households.  Repeat in your community!

Presentation Slides

Presenters:
Kathie Barkow, Principal, Aspire Consulting LLC 
Kathie Barkow is a trainer, consultant, and project manager from the San Francisco Bay Area of California with over 25 years of experience in the fields of homelessness, housing, and services. Her recent efforts have focused on systems improvement and housing-focus. Her experience includes training and project management for measuring, reporting, and improving outcomes; staff training, retreats, and learning collaboratives to align organizational culture and practices toward “housing first, housing fast” approaches; optimizing rapid rehousing services; and training multiple, diverse community stakeholders about the cultural shift and technical refining to be more permanent housing- and outcome-focused. Much of her work has been with multiple stakeholder collaborations consisting of continuum of care staff, mainstream system representatives, other funders, consumers of services, and nonprofit providers. Her other experience includes a mix of direct service experience, non-profit management, technical assistance about federal and state homeless and housing programs, project management, managing Homeless Counts, system-level coordination and redesign, planning for and implementing Coordinated Access Systems, implementing and operating a Homeless Management Information Systems, and training related to these areas.

Ian Kinder-Pyle, Program Coordinator, Washington State Department of Commerce
Ian is the Point in Time Count Coordinator for the Balance of State at the Department of Commerce. A recent graduate from Pacific Lutheran University, he studied economics and political science. He has held several legislative and public policies positions and enjoys the very large spreadsheets that he gets to play with at Commerce.

Sarah Rajski, MPA, Senior Manager, Building Changes
Sarah Cotton Rajski is a Senior Manager at Building Changes. Building Changes is a nonprofit that believes everyone in Washington can be stably housed and strengthens the leaders, organizations, and systems that make it possible. Sarah provides capacity building and training in the areas of results based facilitation, leadership development, and style awareness using the Meyers-Briggs Type Indicator tool. Her work includes working with external partners and building the capacity of Building Changes internal staff. Prior to joining Building Changes, Sarah was a Research Associate with MEM Consultants while completing her Master’s of Public Administration from the Daniel J. Evans School of Public Affairs at University of Washington and worked with homeless youth in San Francisco. She holds a BA in Sociology and Anthropology from Middlebury College.

 

A13: Survivors Need You: How You Can Help!  
Domestic violence is a leading cause of homelessness -- every housing program serves survivors at some point. This workshop is meant to help participants recognize the unique needs of survivors and provide a trauma-informed response while offering suitable housing options.

Presentation Slides

Presenters:                                
Kendra Gritsch, MSW, Program Specialist, Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence
Kendra Gritsch is a Project Specialist at the Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence, working on both Domestic Violence Housing First and public policy. She has been active in the movement to end domestic violence and homelessness for over 8 years, working as a domestic violence advocate, housing case manager, and homeless prevention provider. She holds a Master of Social Work degree from the University of Washington. 

Linda Olsen, MA, MSW, Housing Project Director, Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence
Linda Olsen is the Housing Project Director with the Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence. She coordinated the Domestic Violence Housing First pilot project, which tested housing stability strategies for survivors of domestic violence. This project has evolved into a five-year demonstration project focusing on systems change and measuring long-term outcomes for survivors and their children. Linda has worked in the field of domestic violence for over 30 years, serving in the roles of shelter director and executive director at two domestic violence agencies. She facilitated the opening of two domestic violence emergency shelters, developed a transitional housing program for survivors with drug and alcohol treatment needs, and piloted rental assistance programs for domestic violence survivors. She currently serves on the Washington State Advisory Council on Homelessness. Linda has graduate degrees in theology and social work. 

 

A14: Movement Building In Turbulent Times  
With a new administration in D.C. and a politically divided state legislature, how can we work across movements to build power for historically marginalized groups and protect the rights of all our communities? Bring your fears and your hopes to hear from a diverse panel that will share ideas and strategies, along with inspiration, for why movement building is more important - and more possible - than ever before.

Presenters:
Mauricio Ayon, Political Director, SEIU 6 - Property Services NW; Co-Chair, Racial Equity Team
Mauricio Ayón, Political Director,  SEIU 6 - Property Services joined SEIU in 2016.  As Political Director, he has led the organization’s political strategy and advocacy efforts to advance immigrants and refugee rights in the labor movement. Prior to joining SEIU 6, Mauricio worked as the Political Director of Washington CAN! Durinbg his career Mauricio has been a community organizer with Latino families in South King County, and has served on the Boards of organizations throughout the Puget Sound region. In 2015, Mauricio received the Roberto Maestas Legacy award from El Centro de La Raza.
Mauricio was born in Mexico and moved to the United States in 1989.

Debbie Carlsen, Executive Director, LGBTQ Allyship
Bio coming soon.

Colleen Echohawk, Executive Director, Chief Seattle Club
Ms. Echohawk (Pawnee/Athabascan) is the Executive Director of the Chief Seattle Club, a nonprofit dedicated to the needs of Native American and Alaska Native people who are experiencing homelessness in Seattle. Chief Seattle Club provides a safe and sacred place to rest, revive and nurture the spirit of urban Native people. As the founder of the Coalition to End Urban Native Homelessness, Ms. Echohawk is committed to homeless advocacy and the belief that all people deserve housing, security and unrelenting acceptance. Ms. Echohawk is a proud mom to two children and is married to Matt Hayashi.

Rachael Myers, Executive Director, Washington Low Income Housing Alliance
Rachael Myers has served as Executive Director for the Washington Low Income Housing Alliance since 2008. Prior to joining the Housing Alliance, Rachael was Director of Organizing and Advocacy for Real Change, Seattle’s street newspaper. She has also worked as a lobbyist for health care, housing, and human services and has managed programs for homeless youth and young adults in Seattle’s University District. Depending on the moment, she’s either terrified or hopeful for the future. Fortunately both lead her to same conclusion - that working for justice is where she needs to be.

Sharonne Navas, Co-Founder and Executive Director, Equity in Education Coalition
Sharonne Navas is the Co-Founder and Executive Director of the Equity in Education Coalition. The first American born child of immigrant parents from Guatemala and El Salvador, Sharonne understands, and values, the complexity of being mutli-lingual and multi-cultural in America.  A native of New York City, Sharonne moved to the Seattle area in 2009.
Past professions include being a community organizer with Stand for Children, Executive Director of Para Los Niños, Assistant Director of Development for NARAL Pro-Choice America, Deputy Executive Director for Ayuda, Inc., and Development Coordinator for the National Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty. In 2010, she was appointed as Commissioner for the Washington State Commission on Hispanic Affairs. In 2016, she was appointed to the Board of Trustees of Green River Community College.
Sharonne was an advisory member for the Thrive By Five‘s “Talk, Love, Play” initiative, a cohort member of Thrive by Five’s “Advancing Racial Equity Theory of Change in Early Learning,” a committee member of the WA State Education Opportunity Gap Oversight and Accountability Committee.  Sharonne is currently a member of the advocacy caucus, community network steering committee and sponsors group of the Road Map Project of CCER.
She also volunteers for the South King Council on Human Services and was a Board member of the League of Education Voters and is on the Steering Committee of the Southeast Seattle Education Coalition.  Sharonne holds a BA in Psychology and Sociology from St. John’s University. She spends her off-time exploring the various foods and wines of WA State with her boyfriend Steve and their tweenie dachshund, Miah.

 

A15: Part II: Intersection Between Race, Class, And Homelessness    
This interactive and experiential workshop will explore the critical link between race and class. Participants should be prepared to examine their own class backgrounds and racial identities. The workshop will consider how issues of class and race affect our common work in homeless services and advocacy.

Please note this is a two-part workshop. Part II (Session A15) will be limited to participants who attended Part I (session A7). 

Presenters:
Anita Garcia Morales, Senior Trainer, Class Action
Anita Garcia Morales received her BA and teaching degree from the University of Washington. After over twenty years as a classroom teacher in Seattle Public Schools (SPS), she moved to the district office where she developed and facilitated equity and race professional development for teachers and administrators for the last ten years of a 35-year career with SPS. In addition to being a Senior Trainer with Class Action, Anita also facilitates Courage and Renewal Circles of Trust, teaches Positive Discipline parent/guardian workshops, delivers equity and race training, is an instructor for the Seattle Teacher Residency Program, and has co-facilitated a cross-class retreat series. The common thread that runs through all that Anita does is her focus on social justice and equity.

Alan Preston, Managing Director, Real Change
Alan Preston is the Managing Director for Real Change Homeless Empowerment Project where he has worked for six years. Alan has committed his career to advocating for economic justice and using his privilege to challenge economic inequality. Alan is also a Senior Trainer with Class Action, a nonprofit whose mission is to inspire action to end classism. Alan has designed and facilitated programs on class for progressive foundations, giving circles, churches, and nonprofit organizations. He holds an MBA from the J.L. Kellogg Graduate School of Management and a BA in political science from Haverford College.
 

Lunch and Keynote Address
Wed, 12:25pm - 1:45pm

Justice Mary Yu, Washington Supreme Court

Mary Yu was appointed to the Washington Supreme Court on May 16, 2014, and subsequently elected.  Justice Yu joined the Supreme Court after more than 14 years as an accomplished trial court judge in King County Superior Court where she presided over a wide variety of criminal, civil, and juvenile cases, and presided over hundreds of adoptions and other family law matters.
Prior to becoming a judge, Justice Yu served as Deputy Chief of Staff to King County Prosecutor Norm Maleng and as a deputy in the Criminal and Civil Divisions.  Before attending law school, Justice Yu worked in the Peace and Justice Office for the Archdiocese of Chicago first as staff and later as Director of that office following her appointment to the position by Cardinal Joseph Bernardin.
Justice Yu has an extensive record of service both on and off the bench, mentoring young attorneys, law clerks, and students; co-chairing the Court’s Minority and Justice Commission; teaching at Seattle University School of Law and serving as Jurist in Residence; co-chairing the Washington State Bar Association/University of Washington Law School Leadership Institute; and serving on the board of FareStart and the advisory board for the University of Washington School of Law’s Gates Public Service Program.  She is personally devoted to the Civility Project of the Robert’s Fund Foundation and to the Seattle Girls’ School Mock Trials, serving as their judge for the last 11 years.
Justice Yu was raised in Bridgeport, a South Side neighborhood in Chicago, by immigrant parents; her mother came from Mexico and her father from China.  She is the first in her family to graduate from college.  She received her B.A. from Dominican University, her M.A. in Religious Studies from Mundelein College of Loyola University in Chicago, and her J.D. from the University of Notre Dame Law School. Justice Yu is the first Asian, the first Latina, and the first member of the LGBTQ community to serve on the Washington State Supreme Court.   
 Justice Yu is the recipient of the following awards: 2016 “Daniel K. Inouye Trailblazer Award” from the National Asian Pacific American Bar Association; 2016 “Imagine Justice” Award from Columbia Legal Services; 2016 Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree from Whitman College, Walla Walla, Washington; 2016 Seattle Women's Pride, Luminary Award; 2015 Seattle Storm, "Inspiring Women" award recipient; 2015 "Brava! Award" from the Women's University Club; 2015 "Woman of the Year" from the Seattle University School of Law and Women's Law Caucus; 2014 “Judge of the Year” from the Washington State Association for Justice; 2014 “Betty B. Fletcher Judge of the Year” Award from Washington Women Lawyers, King County Chapter; 2013 “Public Official of the Year” from the Municipal League Foundation; 2013 Latina/o Amicus Award from Seattle University School of Law Latina/o Law Student Association; 2012 “President’s Award” from the Asian Bar Association of Washington; 2012 “Difference Makers Award” from the American Bar Association Solo, Small Firm and General Practice Division; the 2011 “Judge of the Year” award from the Washington State Bar Association (shared with Justice González); 2011 Seattle Girls’ School Grace Hopper Award; 2009 Norm Maleng Award from the Washington State Bar Association; 2008 “Judge of the Year” from the Asian Bar Association; 2008 President’s Award from Washington Women Lawyers; 2006 “Model of Excellence” Award from the Latina/o Bar Association of Washington; 2005 “Judge of the Year” award from the American Board of Trial Advocates; and 2005 Reah Whitehead Public Leadership Award from Seattle University School of Law.
Justice Yu maintains residency in Seattle and Olympia.

 

Breakout Sessions Track Three
Wed, 2:00pm - 3:30pm

A16: Homelessness On The Rise: Understanding And Communicating The Drivers Of Homelessness  
Since 2013, Washington has seen a steady rise in homelessness. What factors are driving this increase and deepening the homelessness crisis? This session will explore the data behind these factors and how we can effectively communicate that data to push for solutions to the homelessness crisis.

Presentation Slides
Download Infographic
Drivers of Homelessness Briefing Paper

Presenters:
Michael Anderson, Director Of The Housing Trust Fund Project, Center For Community Change

Michael Anderson is the Director of the Center for Community Change’s Housing Trust Fund Project. For three decades, the Project has operated as a clearinghouse of information on housing trust funds throughout the country, providing technical and strategic assistance to organizations and agencies working to create or implement these funds.
Based in Portland, Oregon, Michael provides technical assistance and support to state and local coalitions working to establish and strengthen housing trust funds that dedicate public revenue to creating and preserving affordable housing for people with the lowest incomes.

Reiny Cohen, Director of Communication, Washington Low Income Housing Alliance
Reiny came to the advocacy world by way of a radio career with a bit of activism on the side. She spent 15 years in the Seattle radio market in a variety of on-air roles from morning show producer and sidekick, to news and traffic reporter, to hosting an afternoon show. Feeling a desire to use her communications skills for change, Reiny took a leap and changed careers: first working on electoral and legislative campaigns, and finally landing at the Housing Alliance doing exactly what she set out to do. Reiny is responsible for all the Housing Alliance's communications needs from social media to writen materials, emails and action alerts, and media relations. 

Abi Velasco, Development and Event Coordinator, Washington Low Income Housing Alliance
Abi Velasco graduated from the University of Puget Sound with a BA in Communication Studies in 2015. After graduation she participated in the United Church of Christ’s Justice Leadership Program as the Washington Low Income Housing Alliance’s Social Justice Intern. After her internship, she was hired on full time as the Housing Alliance’s Development and Event Coordinator.

 

A17: Breaking The Charity Mentality: Unconditional Respect In Homeless Services  
Services provided with a charity mentality desire to alleviate suffering but do not address the underlying causes of homelessness. The presenters will propose a rights-based approach to homelessness housing services, which views housing as a human right. We will demonstrate how a rights-based approach incorporates housing first and harm reduction principles and how these principles inform standard operating procedures at all levels of homelessness housing services.

Presentation Slides

Presenters:
Bary Hanson, MPA, Division Director Shelter and Housing, Catholic Community Services of Western Washington
Bary Hanson is the Program Manager of five individual housing and shelter programs serving single adults and youth in various stages of housing for Catholic Community Services of Western Washington. He has 15 years of experience with rapid re-housing, street outreach, medical detox, housing and shelter management, homeless encampment facilitation, and pastoral care services serving marginalized individuals up and down the west coast. He holds a Master’s of Public Administration from The Evergreen State College and has professional certificates in project management, gang intervention, and chemical dependency. 

Meg Martin, MSW, CPC, Homeless Services Program Director, Interfaith Works Community Shelter
Meg Martin holds a Master’s of Social Work from UW Tacoma. Meg has worked with a small team of dedicated outreach workers for two years to push the city of Olympia to allow the opening of the largest low-barrier shelter in the area. The shelter is a 37-bed shelter for highly vulnerable single adults, couples without dependent children, and their pets. 

Julie Montgomery, MPP, Program Manager, Washington State Department of Commerce
Julie Montgomery is a Consolidated Homeless Grant Manager at the Department of Commerce. She has extensive experience in direct social service delivery, including four years as a case manager for Camp Quixote, a tent-city community in Olympia. She earned a Master’s of Public Policy from the University of Delaware with an emphasis in program evaluation. 

 

A18: Fair Housing: Consumer Rights And Housing Provider Responsibilities  
Description coming soon. 

Presentation Slides

Presenters:
Rubai Aurora, MPA, Program Manager, Fair Housing Center of Washington
Rubai Aurora has been with the Fair Housing Center (FHCW) of Washington since July 2015. She oversees testing, education outreach initiatives, delivers training and presentations to housing providers and social service organizations, manages the agency’s social media presence, and represents fair housing priorities in local policy and planning associations. She recently earned a Master’s of Public Administration from the George Washington University. Prior to joining FHCW, she worked with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and Department of Labor in Washington, D.C. on federal funding towards local community development programs. 

Shannon M. Bedard, MSW, Fair Housing Specialist, Northwest Fair Housing Alliance
Shannon M. Bedard is a Fair Housing Specialist with Northwest Fair Housing Alliance, a housing rights organization in Spokane, and is currently lead staff of a National Sex Discrimination grant. Shannon is a Pride Foundation scholar, a graduate of Access to Justice Leadership Academy, and Western States Center’s WILD program. Shannon has worked with multiple non-profits as a Youth Suicide Prevention Educator, Homeless Youth Advocate, LGBT Youth Organizer, and AmeriCorps Promise Fellow.

 

A19: Youth Coordinated Entry  
This session will address how to make Coordinated Entry (CE) work effectively for youth. We will cover the goals of CE, state and federal expectations, strategies for developing youth specific CE, developmentally appropriate assessment tools, addressing CE challenges, and best practices for ensuring youth access to services and resources.

Presentation Slides

Presenters:
Jenna Gearhart, Program Director, United Indians/Labateyah Youth Home
Bio coming soon.

Melinda Giovengo, PhD, CEO and President, YouthCare
Dr. Melinda Giovengo became the Executive Director of YouthCare in November 2006, rejoining the agency she had served as a case manager and program manager more than 20 years prior. She has 30 years of experience in developing and implementing re-engagement programs for out-of-school and homeless youth. She holds an MA in Clinical Psychology and a PhD. in Educational Psychology and is published on issues surrounding homeless youth and the impact of learning disabilities in hard-to-serve populations. Dr. Giovengo speaks locally and nationally on youth homelessness, adolescent mental health issues, and child sexual exploitation. She is the Board Vice Chair of the National Network for Youth and a board member of the Housing Development Consortium and the National Youth Employment Coalition.

Derek Harris, Deputy Director, Community Youth Services
Derek Harris is the Deputy Director of Community Youth Services (CYS), a nonprofit organization empowering youth, young adults, and families since 1970. CYS is an integrated service agency located in Olympia, Washington providing a continuum of programs across shelter/housing, coordinated entry, education/vocation, out-of-home care, juvenile justice, behavioral health, and early intervention with service offices located in Thurston, Mason, Lewis, and Pierce Counties. Derek has worked with youth/young adult programs for over 22 years both in direct service as well as an agency leader for multiple programs. Derek is also an RHY peer monitor for the federal Family and Youth Services Bureau, and the Chair of the Balance of State Continuum of Care - Youth Subcommittee.

Cole Ketcherside, MPA, Office of Homeless Youth Program Coordinator, Washington State Department of Commerce
Cole Ketcherside provides guidance and technical assistance to Office of Homeless Youth grantees on program implementation, reporting, and data compliance. Cole has over ten years of experience working directly with homeless and at risk youth as a former street outreach worker, case manager, and program coordinator. Cole has directed and produced two documentaries about the lives of homeless and at risk youth and has an MPA from the Evergreen State College.

 

A20: Prioritization Pays Off!  
Without enough resources to serve everyone, prioritization is critical and effective in reducing homelessness. Learn the essentials about prioritization and why it’s critical to an effective crisis response system that helps communities achieve functional zero. Hear from communities that have made system and program changes to prioritize and reduce homelessness.

Presentation Slides

Presenters:
Kathie Barkow, Principal, Aspire Consulting LLC 
Kathie Barkow is a trainer, consultant, and project manager from the San Francisco Bay Area of California with over 25 years of experience in the fields of homelessness, housing, and services. Her recent efforts have focused on systems improvement and housing-focus. Her experience includes training and project management for measuring, reporting, and improving outcomes; staff training, retreats, and learning collaboratives to align organizational culture and practices toward “housing first, housing fast” approaches; optimizing rapid rehousing services; and training multiple, diverse community stakeholders about the cultural shift and technical refining to be more permanent housing- and outcome-focused. Much of her work has been with multiple stakeholder collaborations consisting of continuum of care staff, mainstream system representatives, other funders, consumers of services, and nonprofit providers. Her other experience includes a mix of direct service experience, non-profit management, technical assistance about federal and state homeless and housing programs, project management, managing Homeless Counts, system-level coordination and redesign, planning for and implementing Coordinated Access Systems, implementing and operating a Homeless Management Information Systems, and training related to these areas.

Shelley Kjos, Housing Program Manager, Community Action of Skagit County
Bio coming soon.

Nora LeBlanc, Program Director Housing and Community Services, Coastal Community Action Program
Bio coming soon.

Cassie Lentz, Housing Resource Coordinator, Grays Harbor County Public Health & Social Services
Cassie Lentz was born and raised in Aberdeen, WA (Grays Harbor County). She holds a Bachelors in Marketing and Finance from Western Washington University and has nearly 7 years of experience in community development and project management. She served for five years as the Program Officer of the Grays Harbor Community Foundation managing the Grants, Scholarship, and Nonprofit Capacity Building programs for the organization to improve the quality of life for citizens of Grays Harbor. In 2015 she joined the staff at Grays Harbor Public Health and Social Services as the Housing Resource Coordinator. Her role as Housing Coordinator includes drafting, publishing, and implementing the 10 year plan to end homelessness, manage capacity building work under a USDA grant, and administer/monitor local homeless housing programs. Outside of work Cassie enjoys spending time with her husband and two young daughters, traveling, and trying new recipes.

 

A21: It Can Be Done! Translating Lessons Learned From Ending Veteran Homelessness Initiatives To Other Homeless Populations  
Several communities in Washington are achieving remarkable success reducing homelessness among veterans. This session will discuss the community based strategies and the WAServes platform that have linked providers to elevate service coordination, accountability, and outcomes for all veterans.  Come learn and discuss how these local effective practices and lessons learned from the veteran homelessness arena can be applied to other populations experiencing homelessness.

Presentation Slides from Kirsten Jewell
Presentation Slides from Mike Schindler

Presenters:
Kirsten Jewell, EMPA, Housing and Homelessness Program Manager, Kitsap County Department of Human Services
Kirsten Jewell has had an instrumental role in homelessness programs in Kitsap County for more than a decade, managing grant programs and facilitating systems changes. Over the last several years, Kirsten has been a leader in the Homes for All Who Served initiative, an effort to end veteran homelessness in Kitsap County. Through building strong local partnerships, garnering the support of elected leaders, and putting its own twist on best practices, Kitsap has had great success towards ending veteran homelessness.

Mike J. Schindler, CEO, Operation Military Family
Mike Schindler, US Navy veteran, is a recognized expert on veteran issues, government processes, and leadership development. Known as a “tactical visionary,” Mike has over 20 years of hands-on/boots-on-ground project management, coaching, and executive experience working in and with the military, start-ups, federal and state agencies, non-profits, universities, and Fortune 500 companies. Mike’s passion is to train and equip leaders in a way that will improve morale and profits.

Sabina Wagner-Lewis, Lead Social Worker, HUD-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing
Bio coming soon.

 

A22: Moving From Talk To Action: An Introduction To Results Based Facilitation 
Much of our work takes place in meetings, yet we all experience meetings that go nowhere. This skill-building workshop is designed to build participants’ capacity to design, participate in, and facilitate meetings to accelerate progress. Come practice a set of skills that support groups to have focused conversations that move to achieving results. 

Speakers:
Emily Mirra, Senior Manager, Building Changes
Emily Mirra is a Senior Manager at Building Changes. She provides capacity building and technical assistance to public sector entities, service providers, and other partners in areas that support key strategies to reducing family homelessness. She completed her Results Based Facilitation (RBF) qualification in 2015 and works with external partners and internal Building Changes staff to build their capacity to get results in their work. Emily brings six years of nonprofit experience in community engagement, training, adult education, curriculum design, and program development to her role. Prior to joining Building Changes, she worked as an adult educator in immigrant and refugee community-based organizations. Emily is a certified ESL instructor and received her BA from Vassar College. 

Sarah Rajski, MPA, Senior Manager, Building Changes
Sarah Cotton Rajski is a Senior Manager at Building Changes. Building Changes is a nonprofit that believes everyone in Washington can be stably housed and strengthens the leaders, organizations, and systems that make it possible. Sarah provides capacity building and training in the areas of results based facilitation, leadership development, and style awareness using the Meyers-Briggs Type Indicator tool. Her work includes working with external partners and building the capacity of Building Changes internal staff. Prior to joining Building Changes, Sarah was a Research Associate with MEM Consultants while completing her Master’s of Public Administration from the Daniel J. Evans School of Public Affairs at University of Washington and worked with homeless youth in San Francisco. She holds a BA in Sociology and Anthropology from Middlebury College. 

 

A23: Taming The Dragon: Trauma Informed Self Care    
Taming the Dragon is a groundbreaking, self-care training seminar, for social service providers and for anyone who has experienced addiction, violence, poverty, homelessness, and other adversities. Trauma Informed Care is at the center of this training, exploring how our personal trauma informs how we care for others, as well as how we care for ourselves. 

Presenter:
Rebekah Demirel, LAc, RAc, MPCC, Trauma Specialist, Trauma Integration Programs
Rebekah Demirel is the founder and director of Trauma Integration Programs. Rebekah has more than a decade of experience as an ambulance paramedic, twenty-two years of experience as a paramedic trainer, and fifteen years of mental health counseling experience specializing in post-traumatic stress and critical incident stress (licensed in British Columbia). She is also a licensed East Asian medicine practitioner and acupuncturist, practicing in Seattle, Washington and Victoria, BC. Rebekah’s unique skill set and experience are informed by her own traumatic childhood and teen years spent on the street and in the foster care system, giving her a special familiarity and empathy for trauma and loss. She serves on the planning council for Seattle King County Healthcare for the Homeless and is an active and fierce volunteer advocate for people who are homeless and underprivileged.

 

Breakout Sessions Track Four
Wed, 3:50pm - 5:05pm

A24: Federal Housing And Homelessness Policy Update  
The federal policy landscape has dramatically shifted with the new President, Congress, and Secretary of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Join this session to learn more about federal housing and homelessness policy opportunities and risks, and how you can affect federal policy from right here at home.

Presentation Slides:
Dara Baldwin
Sara Mickelson

Presenters:
Dara Baldwin, MPA, Senior Public Policy Analyst, National Disability Rights Network
Born in Torrejon, Spain to parents involved in serving their country, the desire to serve has continued through her life. Currently, Ms. Baldwin is the Senior Public Policy Analyst for the National Disability Rights Network (NDRN) in Washington, DC. NDRN is the nonprofit membership organization for the federally mandated Protection and Advocacy Systems and Client Assistance Programs, the largest provider of legally based advocacy services to people with disabilities in the US.
Ms. Baldwin works on NDRN’s diversity and cultural competency team and is responsible for outreach as well as working on coalitions to assist with better legislative outcomes for the community. She has extensive knowledge of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and other disability laws. She has a keen ability for networking and outreach to grassroots national and international advocates, and she has led multiple national and international advocacy campaigns. Ms. Baldwin worked on 11 bills that passed in Congress and were signed by President Barack Obama during his term in office.
Ms. Baldwin holds a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from Rutgers University, Newark, NJ and was a Pi Alpha Alpha honors Graduate with a Masters of Public Administration from Rutgers University the School of Public Affairs and Administration, Newark, NJ. She believes that it is her duty to move forward with her career goals and at the same time, create a pathway for others. Follow: @NJDC07

Sarah Mickelson, Esq, Director of Public Policy, National Low Income Housing Coalition
Sarah Mickelson joined the National Low Income Housing Coalition (NLIHC) as Director of Public Policy in June 2016. Sarah previously worked with Enterprise Community Partners as a Senior Analyst. In this role, she focused on building Congressional support for federal affordable housing and community development appropriations, including funding for programs administered by HUD and USDA. Prior to Enterprise, Sarah served as Policy Counsel at Rapoza Associates, a government affairs and lobbying firm specializing in affordable housing and community development, where she focused largely on rural development. While working as a Legislative and Policy Analyst at the National Community Reinvestment Coalition, Sarah’s portfolio included expanding access to affordable mortgage and small business credit in low-income communities. Sarah graduated from the University of Connecticut, School of Law after receiving her Bachelor’s degree from the University of Virginia. She has also been a member of the Virginia State Bar since 2009.

Rachael Myers, Executive Director, Washington Low Income Housing Alliance
Rachael Myers has served as Executive Director for the Washington Low Income Housing Alliance since 2008. Prior to joining the Housing Alliance, Rachael was Director of Organizing and Advocacy for Real Change, Seattle’s street newspaper. She has also worked as a lobbyist for health care, housing, and human services and has managed programs for homeless youth and young adults in Seattle’s University District. Depending on the moment, she’s either terrified or hopeful for the future. Fortunately both lead her to same conclusion - that working for justice is where she needs to be.

 

A25: By Name Lists: More Than Veterans And People Experiencing Chronic Homelessness  
The use of “By Name Lists” for veterans and people who are chronically homeless is a widely established national best practice. Seattle and King County have developed processes to use “By Name Lists” for other populations, such as families and long term shelter stayers. Come learn how these lists work in conjunction with Coordinated Entry to ensure timely and effective housing placement.

Presentation Slides

Presenters:
Sara Hoffman, Coordinated Entry for All Program Manager, King County Department of Community and Human Services
Sara Hoffman graduated from the University of Washington with a Master’s Degree in Social Work. She has been working in the field of social services for nearly ten years. Her work has primarily included managing homeless housing programs in King County with a focus on behavioral health and youth and young adults. Sara is now the program/system manager for the Coordinated Entry system in King County.

Dusty Olson, MA, Strategic Advisor, Seattle Human Services Department
Dusty Olson is currently a Strategic Advisor with the Seattle Human Services Department focused on transforming the homelessness services system in Seattle and King County. The system transformation is focused on ensuring that our community’s homeless intervention system is focused on moving people into permanent housing and is promoting evidence based practices. Dusty has worked for the City of Seattle Human Services Department as a Planning and Development Specialist focused on gender based violence, rapid re-housing, transitional housing, and system transformation since 2011. Prior to joining the City, Dusty worked for 17 years addressing families and individuals in crisis as a direct service provider and in non-profit leadership. Dusty holds a BA from the University Portland and a MA San Diego State University.

 

A26: Leveraging State Resources To Help People With Disabilities Access Housing And Employment  
Washington’s Medicaid Transformation Demonstration creates targeted Medicaid benefits to help people get jobs with supported employment services and access housing through supportive housing services. The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) provides assistance, funding, and additional resources to help people with disabilities return to work. This session will cover how these programs can work together in the most effective manner.

Presentation Slides:
Medicaid 1115 Waiver overview
Megan Grundbrecker

Presenters:
Mike Donegan, MSW, Program Manager, DESC
Mike Donegan is the Manager of Supported Employment at DESC and has been involved in Community Mental Health Services for more than 40 years and Supported Employment for more than 25 years. He has worked in State Hospitals, Community In-Patient Psychiatric Units, Day Treatment Programs, and Community Mental Health Agencies. He has supervised Case Managers, Peer Specialists, and Employment Specialists as he has worked to integrate Employment Services into all aspects of the comprehensive continuum of services at both Harborview Mental Health Services and DESC. 

Megan Grundbrecker, MS, CRC, Vocational Rehabilitation Supervisor, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation
Megan is the Supervisor in the Seattle Central office of the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR). The Seattle Central DVR office serves the highest percentage of DVR participants who are homeless in the state.  

Kaitlyn Lindsay, MA, LMHC, Employment Specialist, DESC 
Kaitlyn Lindsay is the Lead Employment Specialist and Job Developer at the Downtown Emergency Service Center in Seattle, WA. She earned her BA in Psychology and Criminal Justice from the University of Connecticut and her MA in Clinical Mental Health Counseling from Lesley University. Kaitlyn has worked in psychiatric day treatment with homeless youth and families and as a case manager before becoming involved in Mental Health Supported Employment. She is passionate about employment as recovery, human connectedness, and working to help create meaning in people's lives. 

Kelly Lovan, BS, Employment Specialist, DESC
Kelly Lovan has been an Employment Specialist for 2 years working both in Washington State and Kentucky. She is taking the lead on introducing Supported Employment Services into the Housing First programs of DESC.

 

A27: Statewide Efforts To Prevent And End Youth Homelessness    
Washington State is leading the nation with its focus on preventing and ending youth and young adult homelessness. In this session, the Office of Homeless Youth and A Way Home Washington will discuss the causes and characteristics of youth homelessness and the roadmap to ensure that all young people have a safe and stable place to call home.

Presentation Slides

Presenters:
Kim Justice, Executive Director, Office of Homeless Youth, Washington State Department of Commerce
Kim Justice leads the Office of Homeless Youth at the Washington State Department of Commerce. Kim has over 14 years of experience in legislative advocacy, public policy, and community organizing. Prior to joining the Office of Homeless Youth, Kim was a Senior Budget Analyst with the Washington State Budget and Policy Center. She has worked as a Policy Advisor for the Washington State House of Representatives, as a Community Organizer, a Lobbyist with the Statewide Poverty Action Network, and served as Board Vice President for The Mockingbird Society, a nationally recognized youth advocacy organization.

Jim Theofelis, Executive Director, A Way Home Washington
Jim Theofelis has been serving children, youth, and families for nearly 40 years. He is currently the founding Executive Director of A Way Home Washington, a growing movement to prevent and end youth and young adult homelessness in Washington state. He is a state licensed mental health and chemical dependency counselor serving in a variety of roles ranging from direct service to senior management. In 1999, he authored and advocated for passage of the HOPE Act which resulted in Hope beds and Responsible Living Skills beds for adolescents who are street-involved and homeless. In 2001 he founded The Mockingbird Society which, under his 15 year tenure, developed nationally acclaimed programs, including the Mockingbird Youth Network and the Mockingbird Family Model. Jim has been instrumental in leading and advocating for the passage of multiple pieces of legislation related to improving the policies, practices, and resources focused on preventing and ending youth homelessness across Washington state. Jim is the proud recipient of several awards, including the prestigious Congressional Angels in Adoption Award and the national Jefferson Award for public service. Jim is married with two adult children.

 

A28: Race, Leadership, And Homelessness: The Intentions And Paradoxes  
In King County, people of color are disproportionately represented in the homeless population. However, homeless provider agencies are predominantly led by white males and are more likely to have a majority white staff.  Join us as we name the elephant in the room and have a courageous conversation on how we avoid paternalism and invite diverse leadership. 

Presentation Slides

Presenters:                
Colleen Echohawk, Executive Director, Chief Seattle Club
Ms. Echohawk (Pawnee/Athabascan) is the Executive Director of the Chief Seattle Club, a nonprofit dedicated to the needs of Native American and Alaska Native people who are experiencing homelessness in Seattle. Chief Seattle Club provides a safe and sacred place to rest, revive and nurture the spirit of urban Native people. As the founder of the Coalition to End Urban Native Homelessness, Ms. Echohawk is committed to homeless advocacy and the belief that all people deserve housing, security and unrelenting acceptance.
Ms. Echohawk is a proud mom to two children and is married to Matt Hayashi. 

Mark Putnam, Executive Director, All Home                        
Mark Putnam is the Director of All Home, a broad coalition of government, business, faith communities, nonprofits, and homeless advocates working together to make homelessness rare, brief, and one-time. In 2015, Mark was named Change Agent of the Year by Real Change newspaper. Mark joined All Home in December 2013. Previously, at Building Changes, he was responsible for overseeing technical assistance, grant-making, and evaluation of family and youth and young adult homelessness initiatives. At AIDS Housing of Washington, Mark consulted with cities nationwide to develop housing for people living with HIV/AIDS. Mark graduated from Whitman College, holds a MA in Public Administration from Eastern Washington University, and is a graduate of the Nonprofit Executive Leadership Institute at University of Washington, Evans School of Public Affairs. He lives in Ballard with his wife and daughter.  

 

A29: Housing And Gender Justice  
Housing is a necessity and a basic human right that is often denied to transgender and gender non-conforming (GNC) people. For trans and GNC people who became homeless, safety nets meant to help people in a housing crisis often fail.  Awareness of housing rights for trans persons remains low, however, resulting in rising homelessness.  Let’s change that.

Presentation Slides

Presenters:
Shannon M. Bedard, MSW, Fair Housing Specialist, Northwest Fair Housing Alliance 
Shannon M. Bedard is a Fair Housing Specialist with Northwest Fair Housing Alliance, a housing rights organization in Spokane, and is currently lead staff of a National Sex Discrimination grant. Shannon is a Pride Foundation scholar, a graduate of Access to Justice Leadership Academy, and Western States Center’s WILD program. Shannon has worked with multiple non-profits as a Youth Suicide Prevention Educator, Homeless Youth Advocate, LGBT Youth Organizer, and AmeriCorps Promise Fellow.

Elayne Wylie, Director of Operations and Development, Gender Justice League
Elayne Wylie is one of the founders of Gender Justice League, a trans civil and human rights organization, and serves as their Director of Development and Operations Director. She is a long time Seattle transgender civil rights and social justice activist, and has served in leadership in many local Seattle non-profits. Her expertise is in consulting on the business case for workplace equality for trans and gender diverse people, addressing small-business and corporate workplaces across the Pacific Northwest. She has also served on the boards of both Ingersoll Gender Center and Seattle Pride Parade. Her work with the Washington SAFE Alliance campaign has brought her to Olympia, Spokane, and the Tri-Cities, as she seeks to protect and preserve the civil rights of the transgender people of Washington State.
She is also a professionally trained and seasoned film producer, and works part-time doing corporate video on the Eastside, and lives with her wife and son in the north end.

 

A30: Vulnerability Assessment Round Table 
Communities around the state are at various stages of developing, implementing, evaluating, and improving vulnerability assessments as part of coordinated entry. This round table session will be an opportunity for peer sharing and learning regarding the use of vulnerability assessments to prioritize access to shelter, rapid rehousing, and permanent housing.

Presentation Slides

Presenter:
Stephanie Reinauer, MS, CHG Program Manager, Washington State Department of Commerce
Stephanie joined the CHG program management team in 2012, bringing her experience as a local HMIS coordinator and a background in social research.

 

Breakout Sessions Track Five
Thurs, 9:00am - 10:30am

B1: Opportunities To Expand Supported Employment Through Washington’s Medicaid Transformation Demonstration  
Washington’s recently approved Medicaid Transformation Demonstration will create a targeted supported employment Medicaid benefit called Foundational Community Supports. Join this session to learn about this benefit’s implementation timeline and how supported employment services can complement support provided by the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families and Housing and Essential Needs programs. 

Presentation Slides:
IPS Overview
TANF Presentation

Presenters:
Lisa Bennet-Perry, Best Grant Program Manager, Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery, Washington State Department of Social and Health Services
Lisa Bennett-Perry is a Program Manager and Trainer for the IPS (Individual Placement and Support) BEST (Becoming Employed Starts Today) program. She brings to DSHS-DBHR over 20 years of experience providing services to overcome barriers to employment. This includes services for job seekers with behavioral health conditions, developmental disabilities, chemical dependency and co-occurring disorders. Her programming experience consists of Supported Employment, Transitioning Incarcerated Adults and Youth, WorkFirst, and Work Investment Opportunity Act (WIOA). Previously, Lisa worked for the Thurston County Workforce Development Council as a Workforce Development Specialist where she was responsible for the implementation of a re-entry employment program for individuals identified as chemical dependent and/or have mental health conditions.

Linda Custer, General Manager, Sunrise Mental Health Services
Linda Custer is the General Manager at Sunrise Mental Health Services and is responsible for the agency’s overall supported employment services.

Melodie Pazolt, Supported Employment/Supportive Housing Program Administrator, Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery, Washington State Department of Social and Health Services
Ms. Melodie Pazolt has over 25 years experience in community rehabilitation with people with mental illness and people with developmental disabilities. She has operated 15 independent grants and contracts, direct services to consumers of mental health services, and has managed the activities of a core mental health funded employment program. She formerly was the manager of the Columbia River Mental Health Services Clearview Employment Program. At Columbia River Mental Health she supervised over 30 full time staff who operate mental health employment programs, welfare to work programs, mental health, developmental disability, vocational rehabilitation, Workforce Investment Act contract services, and multiple federal grants serving youth and adults with disabilities, as well as individuals who are homeless. Prior to her position at DSHS-DBHR, she worked for the Clark County Department of Community Services as the Consumer and Stakeholder Affairs Manager. Ms. Pazolt is currently the Supported Employment/Supported Housing Program Administrator for the Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery services. Ms. Pazolt brings an understanding of not only the issues that face individuals with psychiatric disorders, but an overall understanding of the various systems that may be involved in that person’s life.

Debbi Trosvig, Supervisor, Office of Community and Homeless Services, Snohomish County Human Services Department
Debbi Trosvig is the Supervisor of the Office of Community and Homeless Services for the Snohomish County Human Services Department. Prior to this position, Ms. Trosvig was the lead for the King County Family Homelessness Initiative at the Committee to End Homelessness (All Home); coordinating a multi-year regional system change effort. She has more than 26 years of experience in the public sector working to implement efforts to end homelessness. 

 

 

B2: De-Escalation Strategies For Care Providers  
Recognition of our own thoughts, feelings, and behaviors makes us stronger care providers for ourselves, and others. Self-knowledge is the key to compassionate, respectful, safe de-escalation of crisis. Learn strategies to exercise self-awareness, identify and respond to behaviors, and recognize behavioral health symptoms that may contribute to crisis situations.

Presentation Slides

Presenter:
Jessica M. Shook, LMHC, Mental Health Program Administrator, Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery, Washington State Department of Social and Health Services
For the past year and a half Jessica Shook has been the Program Administrator for involuntary treatment at Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery. Previously, Jessica worked with clients with chronic mental health and co-occurring disorders in community and institutional settings as a Designated Mental Health Professional, crisis counselor, family therapist, and jail transition case manager.

 

B3: Building Power Through Organizing In Your Community    
We’re in a housing crisis and we need to build power. The Resident Action Project (RAP) is building a statewide network with folks who are directly impacted by housing instability and homelessness through community organizing. Today we’ll present our vision and an overview organizing tools to bring RAP to your community.

Presentation Slides

Presenters:
Mr. B, Resident Action Project Leader, Washington Housing Alliance Action Fund
Bretrand Harrell, known by many as Mr. B, works with the Resident Action Project and the Washington Low Income Housing Alliance as an advocate. He graduated from Mercer University in Georgia and is pursuing a MA in Philosophy. He joined RAP a year ago in order to better help people who are homeless and people who are discriminated against in low income housing. He is also a proud father of seven and grandfather of three.

Hill Cummings, Resident Action Project Leader, Washington Housing Alliance Action Fund
Hill Cummings is an advocate in Bellingham and in Whatcom County. During the three decades that he’s lived in the Pacific Northwest, he has volunteered and served on boards of several organizations pushing for social justice. He works on issues of affordable housing and homelessness, the criminal justice system, mental and behavioral health, and more. He has been a Washington State Certified Peer Counselor since 2009. Currently, he is a leader for the Resident Action Project in Bellingham and is a vendor and board member of Real Change Whatcom County. 

Kristina Nielander, Community Organizer, Washington Housing Alliance Action Fund
Kristina Nielander is a Community Organizer at the Washington Low Income Housing Alliance. She graduated from the University of Kansas in 2015 and completed a year of service with the Housing Alliance with the Quaker Experiential Service and Training program. Following her year of service, she joined the full staff to continue working on the Resident Action Project, which is a program that engages people who are low income, who live in affordable homes, and who have experienced homelessness in statewide organizing and advocacy for affordable homes and an end to homelessness.

Mindy Woods, Resident Action Project Leader, Washington Housing Alliance Action Fund
Mindy Woods has been involved in advocacy for the past five years. She is a single mother and a veteran of the U.S. Navy. She and her son experienced homelessness twice. During her stay at a women’s shelter, she was asked to testify on a bill in Olympia, and that sparked her passion for advocacy. She joined the Bill and Melinda Gates Homeless Advisory Board in 2012 and participated in the first Emerging Advocates Program with the class of 2013. She has since been actively civically engaged. She is currently a leader in the Resident Action Project and sees the program as an opportunity to work collectively with people in her community who are also passionate about making positive policy change.

 

B4: Landlord Engagement And Retention  
As communities increasingly rely upon the private market to provide housing for people who are experiencing homelessness, positive relationships between housing providers and landlords have never been more critical. This session will feature three different approaches to landlord engagement and retention, and will include a panel of seasoned providers who will describe how they cultivate and maintain thriving relationships with landlords.

Presentation Slides from Natalya Verley
Presentation Slides from Sue McCarthy

Presenters:
David Aron, BA, MBA, Landlord Engagement Specialist, YWCA Seattle | King | Snohomish
David Aron brings nearly 20 years of experience as a Puget Sound area real estate broker and property manager. He joined the YWCA in August 2016 bringing his wealth of knowledge in the area to the role of Landlord Engagement Specialist. Prior to working in real estate, David spent 10 years working in London in financial services. Upon returning to this country, his wife insisted on moving back to the Northwest, where she grew up.

Sue McCarthy, BA, Housing Retention/Conflict Resolution Specialist, Dispute Resolution Center, Volunteers of America Western Washington
Sue McCarthy works at the Dispute Resolution Centers in Seattle and Everett. She provides outreach and training in conflict resolution and negotiations to tenants, leasing agents, property managers, and nonprofit housing staff, encouraging more housing providers to engage in conflict resolution rather than resorting to eviction proceedings. She also provides conflict coaching, telephone conciliation, and mediation services to tenants living on low incomes at risk of eviction and their landlords. Sue holds a Bachelor’s of Communications from the University of Washington. 

Natalya Verley, BA, Landlord Engagement Specialist, YWCA Seattle | King | Snohomish
Natalya Verley has a background in the multi-family housing industry. Through her work as a leasing agent, she became familiar with the challenges encountered by prospective tenants with past evictions, criminal histories, and poor credit. She joined the YWCA in February 2016 where she has brought all of her experience of seeking housing solutions for homeless and “at risk” populations through collaboration with rental owners and managers.

 

B5: Implementing A Diversion Strategy In Your Community  
Catholic Charities of Spokane recently incorporated a diversion program into Spokane’s coordinated entry system. Join this session to learn how case management tools can help households reach stability and avoid homelessness. Learn how your community can implement a diversion strategy by collaborating with households to find creative solutions to solve housing crises. 

Presentation Slides

Presenters:
Sharon Stadelman, Director of St. Margaret’s Shelter, Catholic Charities of Spokane 
Sharon Stadelman has worked for Catholic Charities of Spokane for over 10 years. Sharon oversees an emergency and transitional shelter for mothers and children along with coordinated entry, diversion, and rapid rehousing programs.

Jackie Thomson, MSW, Assistant Director of Community Housing, Catholic Charities of Spokane
Jackie Thomson has worked for Catholic Charities of Spokane for four years and oversees the coordinated entry, diversion, and rapid rehousing programs.

 

B6: Serving Transgender Clients  
Transgender individuals experience broad spectrum discrimination, leading to high rates of homelessness. This session will explore supportive strategies to effectively meet the complex needs of transgender individuals when accessing homeless and housing services.

Presentation Slides

Presenters:
Alain Chan, BA, Clinical Support Specialist, DESC
Alain Chan is a Clinical Support Specialist at 1811 Eastlake, a housing project for formerly homeless chronic alcoholics. Prior to their time at DESC, they worked in community health, helping LGBTQ-identified individuals gain access to health care. From 2013 to 2014, they served as Development Chair of Q-Wave, a grassroots organization for LGBTQ people of Asian descent. They hold a degree in anthropology from Wesleyan University. 

Ryan Yanke, MS, Supportive Housing Project Manager, DESC
Ryan Yanke holds a masters degree in Human Development and Family Studies from Colorado State University. Ryan has served DESC clients for 7 years and has spoken on serving transgender individuals in a wide variety of settings for over 10 years. 

 

B7: Part I: SOAR Nuts And Bolts: Applications And Tracking  
This session will focus on the development of local SSI/SSDI Outreach, Access, and Recovery (SOAR) Community Initiatives. Speakers from the SOAR Initiatives in Clark and Spokane Counties will discuss their programs. Participants will learn about opportunities to collaborate with local DSHS Community Service Offices and how to access additional technical assistance. 

Please note this is a two-part workshop. Part II (Session B14) will be limited to participants who attended Part I (Session B7).

Presentation Slides
Online Application Tracking

Presenters:
Sue Chance, Social Service Coordinator, Economic Services Administration, Washington State Department of Social and Health Services
Sue Chance is the Social Service Coordinator for Region 2 of the Community Services Division (CSD) of the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services. She holds a Bachelor’s of Social Work from Western Michigan University. Sue’s current role supports the Department’s social service staff and their supervisors who work to improve the safety and health of individuals and families in six counties. Sue has over 26 years of experience implementing, training, and coordinating many aspects of CSD’s programs, including SSI Facilitation, HEN Referral, WorkFirst, Pregnant Women’s Assistance, First Steps, Family Violence services, Division of Child Support Good Cause Services, and the Aged, Blind, and Disabled program. Sue believes that when government agencies collaborate with community partners, we get the best outcomes for the individuals we serve. She has a laser focus on working at a statewide level to increase access to consistent training and support to social services so that communities have the resources and tools they need to provide the best possible service to the state’s most vulnerable citizens.
Sue has been a dedicated advocate for individuals dealing with physical or mental disabilities throughout her career. She has been involved in the SOAR initiative since 2008 and currently serves as the state co-lead. Sue has built strong partnerships between CSD, Social Security Administration, and Division of Disability Determination Services with the goal of expediting SSI and SSDI applications for recipients of TANF and the Aged, Blind, and Disabled programs. She works with community providers and links the SOAR model and resources to clients experiencing homelessness.

Pam Heine, Senior Project Associate, Policy Research Associates, Inc.       
Pam Heine is a Senior Project Associate at the SOAR Technical Assistance Center. For 12 years, she worked at Legal Services of New Jersey’s SSI Project, representing nearly 1,000 adult and child recipients of public assistance with the Social Security Administration. She represented individuals at the Administrative Law Judge and Appeals Council stages, achieving a 97 percent approval rate. Her years of experience in the areas of developmental disabilities, mental health, public assistance, and supported employment inform her work as a non-attorney representative. She holds a Master’s of Social Work from Monmouth University as well as certification in psychological first aid (PFA), providing statewide training to first responders. Pam is a content expert on using the SOAR model with SSI/SSDI appeals and SSI for children. Pam is responsible for production of TA Center Webinars and Learning Communities. She provides TA to the states of AZ, DE, IN, KY, NV, NJ, ND, TX, WA, and WI.

Traci Hudson, BA, Case Manager/Local SOAR Lead, Goodwill Industries/Volunteers of America    
Mrs. Traci Hudson has completed her business degree and is earning a bachelor’s degree in organizational management at Whitworth University. Mrs. Hudson has served people who are experiencing homelessness in many different capacities over the last decade. Currently, Traci is a Case Manager for Supportive Services for Veteran Families (SSVF), where she connects homeless veterans to resources in the community with the ultimate goal of achieving housing stability. Traci is a mentor to interns who are pursuing their degrees with the help of Goodwill Industries of the Inland Northwest. Traci took over as Local SOAR lead in the Spokane area in 2016. She collaborates with partners to implement the SOAR process both locally and nationally. Traci collaborates with SSA, DDS, and the City of Spokane with the goal of implementing SOAR countywide. Traci implemented and organizes the Spokane SOAR Application Committee, and she assists SOAR Providers in every step of the SOAR process.

Wanda Johns, BA,  HARPS Program Manager, Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery, Washington State Department of Social and Health Services
Wanda Johns was born in Washington State and has lived near the Puget Sound all of her life. Wanda earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Business Administration, focusing on Management with a minor in Economics, from St. Martin’s College in Lacey, Washington in 1998. Wanda has personally struggled with serious mental health conditions and homelessness for many years. Wanda began working as a part-time supported employee for the Mental Health Division in August of 2008, and she is currently working full-time as the Housing and Recovery through Peer Services (HARPS) Program Manager for the Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery. Wanda is also member of the Division’s Office of Consumer Partnerships, and a Certified Peer Counselor. Wanda also is a State Lead for the SSDI/SSI Outreach Access and Recovery (SOAR) Program. Part of Wanda’s mission is to demonstrate that individuals can achieve housing stability and excel in employment despite disabling conditions with appropriate supports and accommodations. Wanda also works to dispel myths and stigma associated with behavioral health challenges.

Nick Mondau, Operations Manager for Federal Housing Assistance Programs, Washington State Department of Commerce
Nick Mondau is the Operations Manager for Federal Housing Assistance Programs at the Washington State Department of Commerce. The Department of Commerce is the lead agency for the Washington Balance of State Continuum of Care (33 smaller counties in the state). Commerce is responsible for coordinating performance measurement, strategic planning, project selection, and the annual competitive application for the Department of Housing and Urban Development for Continuum of Care Program. Commerce also manages the state-funded Consolidated Homeless Grant, which provides funding for emergency homelessness assistance to local governments and service providers across the state. 

Suzanne Straub, BS, AAC, SOAR Coordinator/PATH Lead, Community Services Northwest
Suzanne Straub is a SOAR Coordinator and local SOAR lead in Vancouver, Washington. She is also the lead for the PATH program at Community Services NW (CSNW), a local non-profit mental health agency. In August 2011, Suzanne worked part-time as a PATH case manager.  She attended a 2-day SOAR training and began completing applications with her clients experiencing homelessness the Monday following the training. Within two weeks, Suzanne had completed three applications using the SOAR model -- two of these were approved!  In March 2012, Community Services NW was granted additional funds to the PATH program, allowing Suzanne more time to focus on SOAR. Near the end of 2012, CSNW was granted even more funding to employ Suzanne full time as the SOAR Coordinator. 
In January 2013, Suzanne began her role as SOAR Coordinator. She worked with local medical facilities and hospitals to ensure that medical records could be obtained free of charge and, in some cases, faster than usual. She established contacts at SSA, DDS, and DSHS. The SOAR TA Center and Pam Heine helped Suzanne host her first steering committee meeting, which resulted in a room full of service providers and SSA/DDS representatives creating an action plan that has since come to fruition. Since that time, Suzanne has named the work of SOAR advocates in the community the Clark County SOAR Initiative. She now provides in-person consultation to current SOAR advocates and facilitates quarterly steering committee meetings, bi-monthly SOAR collaboration meetings (mini trainings), and bi-annual in-person trainings that incorporate the TA Center’s online training.

  

Breakout Sessions Track Six
Thurs, 10:50am - 12:20pm

B8: Individualized Assessments: The Use Of Conviction Records In Housing  
In 2016, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) issued guidance on the use of conviction records in housing. Learn about mass incarceration in relationship to fair housing and the implementation of HUD’s new guidance.

Presentation Slides

Presenters:
Monica Beach, JD, Strategic Enforcement Program Manager, Seattle Office for Civil Rights
Monica Beach is the Enforcement Compliance Lead for the Seattle Office for Civil Rights (SOCR). Since joining SOCR in 2006, Monica has investigated cases alleging discrimination, mentored investigators, and supervised intake operations. She is a former member of Core Team 3, a City of Seattle interdepartmental leadership teams that seeks to eliminate structural and institutional racism. Monica Beach has also worked on the Race and Social Justice Initiative in areas such as equitable community development, building greater public will, and inclusive outreach and public engagement.

Erika Pablo, JD, Civil Rights Strategic Advisor, Seattle Office for Civil Rights
Erika Pablo is the Civil Rights Strategic Advisor for the Seattle Office for Civil Rights. Prior to this position, she investigated and lead trainings for local and federal anti-discrimination laws in employment, housing, public accommodations, and contracting. Outside her work with the City of Seattle, she is the Program Coordinator and a board member for the Incarcerated Mother’s Advocacy Project, a coalition of activists, attorneys, and law students that seek to change the rights afforded to formerly incarcerated and incarcerated parents through legal education and information. Erika received her Juris Doctorate from Seattle University School of Law in 2014.

 

B9: Boots On The Ground: A Harm Reduction Case Management Approach Grounded In Relationships  
The REACH Program has successfully utilized a client centered, relationship based, and harm reduction approach to working with marginalized populations for over twenty years. This hands on, grassroots, and relationship building approach has proven to be effective when providing services to individuals faced with numerous challenges and barriers. Join this session to learn how to implement elements of this approach in your organization’s work. 

Presenters:
Chloe Gale, MSW, Co-Director, REACH 
Chloe Gale has been providing harm reduction services to people who are homeless for 25 years. She helped develop the REACH Program in Seattle, which provides street outreach, case management, and multi-disciplinary services to people who are chronically homeless and adults with substance use disorders. Since 2011, REACH has partnered with police and prosecutors to provide street-based harm reduction services to individuals who have been diverted from through the Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) Program.

Daniel Garcia, CDPT, Law Enforcement Diversion Case Manager, REACH
Daniel Garcia is a Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion Case Manager with the REACH Program. He is working in the heart of downtown Seattle with individuals with a variety of challenges. He works tirelessly to conduct assessments and connect clients to a variety of resources from housing, financial benefits, coordinating complex medical care, to navigating legal issues. He is passionate and driven in his work and has a firm belief in helping clients overcome barriers.
Daniel graduated from Seattle Central College with his Associates of Arts and completed a Chemical Dependency Program. He is currently at Seattle Central College working on his Bachelor of Applied Science in Applied Behavioral Science.

Garrett Fonteyne, Outreach Case Manager, REACH
Garrett Fonteyne is originally from southern California and has resided in Seattle for about ten years. As an undergraduate, he studied cultural anthropology and spent one semester in Tanzania conducting ethnographic research with nomadic pastoralist in the East African Savannah. Upon graduation, he did a one year AmeriCorps term as a youth tutor and project coordinator for a predominantly East African refugee community in South Seattle. For the next two years, he worked with youth and young adults in a variety of settings, including schools, a shelter, and an environmental education camp.
He has been with REACH for almost one year as an outreach case manager. Following the lead of colleagues with years of experience, he proudly works at an agency that takes a harm reduction and trauma-informed approach to working and addressing the needs of individuals who live unsheltered and use drugs and alcohol. He believes that being an advocate begins with meeting people where they are and creating long-term relationships to foster trust and understanding.

Cathy Speelmon, BA, CDP, NCACII, Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion Program Manager, REACH
Cathy Speelmon currently works as the Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion Program Manager at REACH/Evergreen Treatment Services. She has worked as an addiction professional for over 35 years providing direct clinical services, clinical supervision, training, and program management in diverse settings, including work with multicultural youth and adults in agency and private practice settings, inpatient and outpatient addiction treatment, mental health, homeless services, methadone treatment, and harm reduction programs. Cathy is also an instructor at Bellevue College in the Alcohol and Drug Counseling Program. 

 

B10: Moving On: Moving Stable Tenants Forward And Increasing Opportunities         
“Moving On” programs aim to promote independence and choice for supportive housing tenants who are interested in moving to other housing with fewer services. Plymouth Housing Group and King County Housing Authority have been operating Moving On programs for over a decade and will share their lessons learned and promising strategies. 

Presentation Slides

Presenters:
Kristy Johnson, Director of Homeless Initiatives, King County Housing Authority
Kristy Johnson’s career in affordable housing spans fourteen years working to improve housing opportunities for people who are disabled, homeless, and highly vulnerable. Kristy oversees the development and implementation of transitional housing, permanent supportive housing, sponsor-based supportive housing, and a rapid re-housing demonstration program. Kristy’s work is deeply rooted in partnerships and collaboration with nonprofit organizations, local government, veteran and child welfare systems, school districts, and housing developers. 

Jeremy Kern, Property Manager, Plymouth Housing Group
Jeremy Kern oversees five housing first modeled properties in downtown Seattle housing nearly 400 formerly homeless tenants. He has worked in Property Management at Plymouth Housing Group for over seven years serving the tenants and front line staff utilizing harm reduction, trauma informed care, and motivational interviewing. 

Kelli Larsen, MPA, Director of Strategic Initiatives, Plymouth Housing Group
Kelli Larsen holds a Master of Public Administration from the University of Washington. Prior to her current position with Plymouth, Kelli worked as a program manager at King County, with a focus on funding coordination, policy, and planning. Kelli joined Plymouth in July 2013, and works within the community to advocate for sensible public policy in service of people who are homeless. 

Michael Quinn, Clinical Development Manager, Plymouth Housing Group
Michael Quinn has worked in various capacities at Plymouth Housing Group for 12 years, including the implementation of Housing First initiatives, the program development and lease-up of 5 buildings, and the clinical training of direct services staff. 

 

B11: Shifting Sand: Crisis Intervention in the Workplace  
Crisis is an expected part of social services. It can happen to the agency as a whole, to individual staff members, and certainly to the clients we serve. What happens when it seems too much to handle? Come hear how one agency has continued to move forward against impossible odds.

Presentation Slides

Presenters:
Chuck Hendrickson, Founder and Executive Director, Love Overwhelming
Chuck Hendrickson has worked in the social services and mental health sector for the past sixteen years in Cowlitz County. During this time, Chuck has assisted with development of mental health permanent supportive housing, vocational programs, an urban rest stop, an emergency low barrier shelter, Cowlitz County's Coordinated Entry and Assessment System, and intensive community service projects. In 2011, he founded the non-profit organization Love Overwhelming and serves as the current Executive Director. Chuck has served as the Chair of the Cowlitz County Housing First Coalition, serves as Cowlitz County’s SOAR team lead, serves on the Washington State Homelessness Advisory Committee, is an active member of several community coalitions and boards, serves on his City's Planning Commission, and actively works towards coordination and collaboration of homeless services and housing programs.

Caleb Luther, Program Coordinator, Love Overwhelming
Caleb Luther has been working with individuals and families experiencing extreme poverty since 1999, both in the United States and abroad. He has served as vision caster, fundraiser, and advocate for people living in abject poverty in third-world countries, a case manager for people living in transitional shelter, and a housing and resource specialist for individuals who are homeless and at risk of homelessness. As Program Coordinator for Love Overwhelming, Caleb has helped develop Cowlitz County's Coordinated Entry and Assessment System and Prevention/Diversion programs.

 

B12: What Role Do Tiny Homes And Tiny Shelters Have In Responding To Homelessness?
Many communities are considering tiny homes as part of their response to homelessness. This conversation has sparked questions such as how should tiny homes be defined, and should tiny homes be part of an emergency or long-term solution to ending homelessness? Hear panelists working to develop shelter and housing solutions discuss their perspectives on the role of tiny homes in responding to homelessness.

Presentation Slides:
Dara Baldwin
Sharon Lee

Ginger Segel

Presenters:
Dara Baldwin, MPA, Senior Public Policy Analyst, National Disability Rights Network

Born in Torrejon, Spain to parents involved in serving their country, the desire to serve has continued through her life. Currently, Ms. Baldwin is the Senior Public Policy Analyst for the National Disability Rights Network (NDRN) in Washington, DC. NDRN is the nonprofit membership organization for the federally mandated Protection and Advocacy Systems and Client Assistance Programs, the largest provider of legally based advocacy services to people with disabilities in the US.
Ms. Baldwin works on NDRN’s diversity and cultural competency team and is responsible for outreach as well as working on coalitions to assist with better legislative outcomes for the community. She has extensive knowledge of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and other disability laws. She has a keen ability for networking and outreach to grassroots national and international advocates, and she has led multiple national and international advocacy campaigns. Ms. Baldwin worked on 11 bills that passed in Congress and were signed by President Barack Obama during his term in office.
Ms. Baldwin holds a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from Rutgers University, Newark, NJ and was a Pi Alpha Alpha honors Graduate with a Masters of Public Administration from Rutgers University the School of Public Affairs and Administration, Newark, NJ. She believes that it is her duty to move forward with her career goals and at the same time, create a pathway for others. Follow: @NJDC07 

Tedd Kelleher, Managing Director of the Housing Assistance Unit, Washington State Department of CommerceTedd has been with the Department of Commerce since 1994, and is the Managing Director of the Housing Assistance Unit. Tedd manages the Homeless Housing and Assistance Act and leads the creation of the state’s Homeless Housing Strategic Plan.

Sharon Lee, Executive Director, Low Income Housing Institute
Sharon Lee is the Executive Director of the Low Income Housing Institute (LIHI), a non-profit organization based in Seattle. LIHI is celebrating its 25th Anniversary this year. LIHI develops and operates housing for people who are homeless and living on low incomes and provides supportive service programs to assist tenants in maintaining stable housing and increasing self-sufficiency. Lee oversees a staff of 140 engaged in housing development, management, advocacy and supportive services. LIHI staff has developed over 4,000 units of rental and homeownership housing in Washington State. LIHI owns over 1,800 units serving individuals, families, seniors, people who are homeless, and people with special needs. Lee is an advocate on issues of housing justice, housing preservation, and homelessness. She holds a Master of Architecture and a Master of City Planning from M.I.T. and a BA with honors from the University of Pennsylvania. Lee was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from Wilkes University for her work on ending homelessness. LIHI’s housing has won national and local awards for design excellence and environmental sustainability. 

Rachael Myers, Executive Director, Washington Low Income Housing Alliance
Rachael Myers has served as Executive Director for the Washington Low Income Housing Alliance since 2008. Prior to joining the Housing Alliance, Rachael was Director of Organizing and Advocacy for Real Change, Seattle’s street newspaper. She has also worked as a lobbyist for health care, housing, and human services and has managed programs for homeless youth and young adults in Seattle’s University District. Depending on the moment, she’s either terrified or hopeful for the future. Fortunately both lead her to same conclusion - that working for justice is where she needs to be.

Ginger Segel, Senior Housing and Community Developer, Community Frameworks
Ginger Segel is a Senior Housing and Community Developer with Community Frameworks, a statewide non-profit housing developer. She works mostly on homeless housing and community facility projects in both rural and urban communities. She developed Quixote Village, 30 permanent tiny houses in Olympia for single adults experiencing homelessness; the first publically funded tiny house project in the country. Ginger has had a 25 year career in tenant organizing, low income housing program development, housing policy, and now housing development. 

 

B13: Shame And Shame Resilience In Child Welfare   
Research shows us that there are ways to identify, name, and reduce the impact shame has on families and parents who come into contact with Child Protective Services. Building shame resilience allows families to discuss what gets in their way of getting the real work done to put their families back together. Learn how to help families experiencing homelessness work toward common goals that protect children and preserve families. 

Presentation Slides

Presenters:
Heather Cantamessa, Program Coordinator/Parent Ally, Parents for Parents
Heather Cantamessa is a mother of 5, wife, student, recovering addict, and Parent Ally. Her family has spent about 6 years involved in 3 Child Welfare Dependency Court cases. Among many barriers, Heather has experienced periodic homelessness from childhood into adulthood. She currently reaches out and provides resources and support to parents in their journey to overcome similar circumstances.

Tarena Coleman, Parents Representation Program Social Worker, Washington State Office of Public Defense Contractor 
Tarena Coleman has been contracted as a Parent Support Social Worker with the Office of Public Defense since 2007, working with child-welfare involved parents and their attorneys. 

Ambrosia Eberhardt, Parent Ally, Parents for Parents
Ambrosia Eberhardt is a mother of five, recovering addict, Whitworth graduate, co-founder of SPAN, and parent Ally. She serves as the current facilitator of WSPAN, a committee of people committed to effect change in child welfare. She currently helps CPS involved parents navigate the same system she did after having her children placed in foster care. During and after her own CPS case, she experienced periods of homelessness and barriers to housing. 

Vanessa Matthews, Social Worker, Washington State Department of Children and Family Services
Biography coming soon.

 

B14: Part II: SOAR Community Initiative Building  
This session will focus on the development of local SSI/SSDI Outreach, Access, and Recovery (SOAR) Community Initiatives. Speakers from the SOAR Initiatives in Clark and Spokane Counties will discuss their programs. Participants will learn about opportunities to collaborate with local DSHS Community Service Offices and how to access additional technical assistance. 

Please note this is a two-part workshop. Part II (B14) will be limited to participants who attended Part I (session B7)

Presentation Slides

Presenters:
Sue Chance, Social Service Coordinator, Economic Services Administration, Washington State Department of Social and Health Services
Sue Chance is the Social Service Coordinator for Region 2 of the Community Services Division (CSD) of the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services. She holds a Bachelor’s of Social Work from Western Michigan University. Sue’s current role supports the Department’s social service staff and their supervisors who work to improve the safety and health of individuals and families in six counties. Sue has over 26 years of experience implementing, training, and coordinating many aspects of CSD’s programs, including SSI Facilitation, HEN Referral, WorkFirst, Pregnant Women’s Assistance, First Steps, Family Violence services, Division of Child Support Good Cause Services, and the Aged, Blind, and Disabled program. Sue believes that when government agencies collaborate with community partners, we get the best outcomes for the individuals we serve. She has a laser focus on working at a statewide level to increase access to consistent training and support to social services so that communities have the resources and tools they need to provide the best possible service to the state’s most vulnerable citizens.
Sue has been a dedicated advocate for individuals dealing with physical or mental disabilities throughout her career. She has been involved in the SOAR initiative since 2008 and currently serves as the state co-lead. Sue has built strong partnerships between CSD, Social Security Administration, and Division of Disability Determination Services with the goal of expediting SSI and SSDI applications for recipients of TANF and the Aged, Blind, and Disabled programs. She works with community providers and links the SOAR model and resources to clients experiencing homelessness.

Nick Mondau, Operations Manager for Federal Housing Assistance Programs, Washington State Department of Commerce
Nick Mondau is the Operations Manager for Federal Housing Assistance Programs at the Washington State Department of Commerce. The Department of Commerce is the lead agency for the Washington Balance of State Continuum of Care (33 smaller counties in the state). Commerce is responsible for coordinating performance measurement, strategic planning, project selection, and the annual competitive application for the Department of Housing and Urban Development for Continuum of Care Program. Commerce also manages the state-funded Consolidated Homeless Grant, which provides funding for emergency homelessness assistance to local governments and service providers across the state. 

Suzanne Straub, BS, AAC, SOAR Coordinator/PATH Lead, Community Services Northwest
Suzanne Straub is a SOAR Coordinator and local SOAR lead in Vancouver, Washington. She is also the lead for the PATH program at Community Services NW (CSNW), a local non-profit mental health agency. In August 2011, Suzanne worked part-time as a PATH case manager.  She attended a 2-day SOAR training and began completing applications with her clients experiencing homelessness the Monday following the training. Within two weeks, Suzanne had completed three applications using the SOAR model -- two of these were approved!  In March 2012, Community Services NW was granted additional funds to the PATH program, allowing Suzanne more time to focus on SOAR. Near the end of 2012, CSNW was granted even more funding to employ Suzanne full time as the SOAR Coordinator.
In January 2013, Suzanne began her role as SOAR Coordinator. She worked with local medical facilities and hospitals to ensure that medical records could be obtained free of charge and, in some cases, faster than usual. She established contacts at SSA, DDS, and DSHS. The SOAR TA Center and Pam Heine helped Suzanne host her first steering committee meeting, which resulted in a room full of service providers and SSA/DDS representatives creating an action plan that has since come to fruition. Since that time, Suzanne has named the work of SOAR advocates in the community the Clark County SOAR Initiative. She now provides in-person consultation to current SOAR advocates and facilitates quarterly steering committee meetings, bi-monthly SOAR collaboration meetings (mini trainings), and bi-annual in-person trainings that incorporate the TA Center’s online training.

 

Lunch and Keynote Address
Thurs, 12:20pm - 1:40pm

Israel Bayer, Executive Director, Street Roots
Israel Bayer is the Executive Director of Street Roots, the street newspaper that is Portland's flagship publication addressing homelessness and poverty. Israel has been working in the street newspaper movement for more than a decade. He has worked for Real Change in Seattle and for the North American Street Newspaper Association. Israel is also a journalist, poet, photographer, and painter.

 

 

 

 

Call To Action:

Senator Jeannie Darneille, Washington State Senate, 27th Legislative District

I am proud and honored to represent the 27th Legislative District in the Senate, building upon the experience I gained during 12 years in the House of Representatives.
I understand the needs and concerns of families struggling to make ends meet. In the House, I worked to increase education funding for all learners; expanded health care for children, families, and the disabled; developed a safe environment for children and adults to learn, grow, and thrive; safeguarded civil liberties; and promoted economic opportunities to create living-wage jobs that improve the well-being of families.
This work is not finished and I intend to continue as Senator to be the voice of those in need.
I’ve been described as being as tough as a 50-cent steak. I love that description. My faith and experience has motivated me to work to improve the lives of the poor. My career has included: a decade working in colleges and universities across four states and over 30 years working in non-profit social service agencies. Each position increased my awareness of issues such as health care, poverty, homelessness, homophobia and mental health. During the interim between sessions, I now work and consult with non-profit organizations as they go through leadership transitions.
As the oldest of six children in an Air Force family, my folks taught me scores of life lessons – one of which centers on volunteerism. My volunteering started at Planned Parenthood in Bellingham and continues today. I have served on boards of directors for non-profit organizations across our community, cooked at the Hospitality Kitchen, worked on Habitat houses, and been a Big Sister. Suffice it to say, a person can get involved with many wonderful organizations in nearly 30 years. I know I have.
The 27th District has a history of supplying the Senate with strong, dedicated, committed women — most recently, Sen. Debbie Regala and longtime Sen. Lorraine Wojahn, with whom I was fortunate to serve as her aide during the 1985 Legislative session. It is an honor to now hold the same position as those esteemed senators after their retirement in service to the Legislature.
I received my bachelor’s degree in art history from Western Washington University and my master’s in higher education administration from Colorado State University. I’m married to Howard Graham, an attorney in private practice specializing in disability issues. We are blessed with three great sons, one grandson, and for 30 years have lived within a five-block radius within the district. I’m 65 and an avid baseball fan (Go Rainiers!).

 

Breakout Sessions Track Seven
Thurs, 2:00pm - 3:30pm

B15: Housing Immigrants And Refugees  
This session will review challenges related to providing housing to immigrants and refugees. Strategies to successfully help immigrants and refugees access and retain housing will be discussed. 

Presentation Slides

Presenters:
Roble Abdinoor, Case Manager, Muslim Housing Services
Roble Abdinoor is a case manager at Muslim Housing Services (MHS), a non-profit organization established in 1999. Roble was born in Mandera, Kenya and arrived America in 1993. Roble joined MHS in September 2005 and has been advocating for families to become self reliant. 

Rizwan Rizwi, Executive Director, Muslim Housing Services
Rizwan Rizwi is the Executive Director of Muslim Housing Services (MHS) and President and CEO of SAR Wealth Management. Rizwan was born and grew in Newcastle upon Tyne, England and graduated from Newcastle University with a Bachelor of Business Management with honors, and later a Master of Business Administration. He is a member of the Association of MBA’s (AMBA) UK, is Securities Licensed, and a Fiduciary for the clients that he advises in several countries.
Rizwan has extensive experience in the Investment industry and spent a number of years managing an Equity Portfolio at SMITH BARNEY Citigroup. Since 2012, in addition to running SAR Wealth Management, he has been the Executive Director of Muslim Housing Services (MHS). MHS is a culturally competent homeless prevention charity based in Seattle, Washingotn. In 2015, MHS helped house over a 1,000 people across King County who were mainly refugees and immigrants experiencing homelessness. 

 

B16: Dispatch From Under The Dome  
Join Housing Alliance policy staff for an update on the 2017 state legislative session. We'll review the homelessness and affordable housing budget investments and policy bills that have been passed by the legislature. Learn about what's next on the horizon, including the legislative interim, and how to continue forwarding homelessness and affordable housing priorities at the state level.

Presentation Slides
Drivers of Homelessness Brief
Impact of $50 increase
Impact of funding cliff
Overview of Homelessness Surcharge Chart
SHB 1570 Community Statement of Support

Presenters:
Kate Baber, MSW, Homelessness Policy and Advocacy Specialist, Washington Low Income Housing Alliance
Kate Baber joined the Housing Alliance in 2013 and works with its policy team to forward state-level policies and investments to end homelessness, including the HEN/ABD programs, Medicaid, Document Recording Fees and the Consolidated Homelessness Grant, and the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program. Kate also works closely with the Housing Alliance’s Homelessness Advisory Committee to monitor emerging homelessness issues and leads the Conference on Ending Homelessness’ planning team. Kate holds a Master of Social Work degree from the University of Washington and has worked on state-level anti-poverty, economic, and social justice legislative advocacy since 2008.

Michele Thomas, Director of Policy And Advocacy, Washington Low Income Housing Alliance
Michele Thomas is the Director of Policy and Advocacy with the Washington Low Income Housing Alliance. She joined the staff of the Alliance in 2009 after working for eight years as community organizer with the Tenants Union of Washington State, where she helped tenants to organize for justice in their homes and to win new laws including the “Slumlord Accountability Act” in 2005. She believes deeply in the power of organized communities to make change and believes that homelessness will end when the public will demands it.

 

B17: Youth Rapid Re-Housing
Join this session to learn about two Rapid Rehousing Programs serving young adults. Pierce County’s Housing 4 Success program and Seattle/King County’s Rapid Rehousing for Young Adults program will share data and information on how to best deliver Rapid Rehousing services to young adults.

Presentation Slides:
Pierce County
King County

Presenters:
Nick Bayard, MPA, Director, The REACH Center
Nick Bayard is the Director of The REACH Center, which provides thousands of young people in the Greater Puget Sound Region each year with educational programming, career development support, and wrap-around services including housing and case management. Nick served in the Peace Corps in Paraguay, where he worked in the fields of health, environment, and agriculture. He went on to work in preschool development, placing high quality preschools into low income neighborhoods of Washington, DC. He also laid the groundwork for the development of an all-girls' school in Monrovia, Liberia. He holds a bachelor's degree from Brown University and a master's degree in Public Administration from Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government. He lives in Tacoma with his family.

Isis Lara Fernandez, Rapid Rehousing Case Manager, Friends of Youth
Isis Lara Fernandez is the Rapid Rehousing Case Manager at Friends of Youth. She has a Masters in Nonprofit Administration with a focus on Resource Development from Louisiana State University. Isis comes to us having participated in AmeriCorps for three years with a key focus on youth and education. She also has over six years of experience working with neglected youth, aiding historically underrepresented groups, and supporting the advancement of people of color. Her free time is devoted to serving the community by advocating for the strengthening and self- sufficiency of homeless & low-income families in the Seattle/King County area.

Gabriel Manriquez, Permanent Housing Director, Accelerator YMCA
Gabriel Manriquez has worked in the nonprofit social service sector for 10 years. He started his career working with Kinship Support programs in San Diego then working in the Independent Living and Work Force Investment Act Programs. In 2013 Gabriel moved to Seattle to pursue a MA degree in Nonprofit Leadership at Seattle U. During this time Gabe began working at the Accelerator YMCA and started working to implement the Next Step Housing Program, a rental assistance program for young adults experiencing homelessness or unstable housing. Gabe has recently moved into the position of the Permanent Housing Director for the Accelerator YMCA.

Shameka Williamson, Housing Case Manager, The REACH Center
Shameka Williamson is the Lead Housing Case Manager with Housing 4 Success at the REACH center in Downtown Tacoma. She possesses a Bachelors in Applied Behavioral Science and Sociology from Ashford University. She is currently working on a Masters in Human Services from Argosy University. Shameka has been involved with individuals experiencing homelessness though her current position as well as her volunteer experience with Project Homeless Connect. She’s has been at her current career for 1 year and plans for many more. She has years of working with individuals from diverse backgrounds through her years of volunteerism with Safe House, AmeriCorps, and Vetcorps.  She is passionate about community service, advocacy for individuals experiencing homelessness, discrimination, and social justice.

 

B18: Peer Led Services For People With Mental Illness   
Peer support services are an evidence-based mental health model of care and critical for a culturally competent, recovery-based mental health and substance abuse system. This session will introduce attendees to the no-cost peer led classes, support groups and community presentation programs offered by the 23 NAMI affiliates across the state.

Presentation Slides:
John Freeburg
Francesca Martin
Daryn Nelsen-Soza
Lauren Simonds

 

Presenters:
John Freeburg, BA, MA, DMin, Former Board Member, National Alliance on Mental Illness, Washington State
John Freeburg holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Fairhaven College at Western Washington University, a Master of Arts degree from the Chicago Theological Seminary, and a Doctor of Ministry from Meadville/Lombard Theological School (affiliated with the University of Chicago at that time ). He has also completed one year of PhD studies at Union Theological Seminary in New York City. John lives in recovery from schizophrenia, and during the course of his years dealing with his illness, he has been homeless.  

Francesca Martin, PhD, Board Member, National Alliance on Mental Illness, Washington State 
Francesca Martin is the president and founder of solutions4community and the current Chief Program Officer for Compass Housing. She is a trained mental health professional with extensive community-based program development and management experience. She understands both the complexity of health-related social problems as well as some of the most effective approaches to solving them. She has extensive policy experience in affordable and supportive housing—combined with a doctorate in public policy— which has allowed her to hone her understanding of some of the underlying forces that can either keep problems in place or create the momentum that brings positive change.

Daryn Nelsen-Soza, MSW, LSWAIC, Board Member, National Alliance on Mental Illness, Washington State  
Daryn Nelsen-Soza is a graduate of the University of Southern California School of Social Work. She is a member of the Board of Directors of NAMI Washington and her local affiliate, NAMI Thurston/Mason. She is a facilitator for the NAMI signature program Basics, and is a state trainer for both Homefront and Provider Education. She has presented numerous workshops both locally and nationally on a variety of topics, including suicide prevention and awareness and depression. Daryn is currently employed at Seamar Community Health Centers as a social worker on the Care Management Team working with high risk clients with both physical and behavioral health concerns as well as other social issues, such as lack of access to housing, homelessness, and transportation. Daryn has 25 years of ministry and pastoral counseling experience with a diverse group of communities and individuals. including seniors, youth, couples, and the LGBTQ community.

Lauren B. Simonds, MSW, Executive Director/CEO, National Alliance on Mental Illness, Washington State 
Lauren Simonds holds a Master of Social Work degree in organizational administration and planned social change from the University of Washington. She has lived in the Pacific Northwest since 1991 and has worked in the fields of HIV/AIDS, reproductive rights, and Jewish communal service. Most recently she was the Executive Director of Rosehedge/Multifaith Works, an HIV/AIDS housing and support service organization. She has also served as the Executive Director for the state’s largest political reproductive rights organization, NARAL Pro-Choice Washington, and the Seattle Section of the National Council of Jewish Women. Ms. Simonds has a strong background in community building, legislative advocacy, fund development, strategic communications, and leadership development and training.

 

B19: Living Paycheck To Paycheck: Examining The Impact Of Current Wages For Direct Service Workers    
Direct service staff at many housing agencies in Washington often do not make a living wage. This has negative impacts on the population they serve. Our panel will discuss the issues related to low wages for direct service staff at non-profit housing and social service agencies and ways we can incorporate wages into our homelessness advocacy.

Presentation Slides

Presenters: 
Peter Kurt-Glovas, BA, Program Coordinator, Compass Housing Alliance
Pete Kurtz-Gloves is the son of two Screen Actors Guild – American Federation of Television and Radio Artists Union Members, and was raised in the Northeast. He served two terms in AmeriCorps and was a Superstorm Sandy Second Responder. After studying poetry and sociology at Indiana University Pennsylvania, he moved to the west coast and became a case manager and writer committed to leftist working class ideals. He has worked proudly at Compass Housing Alliance since 2014 and is active in his union.

Katelyn Morgaine, SAGE Program Mental Health Case Manager, DESC
Bio coming soon.

Judy Poston, Supportive Services Manager, Solid Ground
Bio coming soon.

Elizabeth Rapuzzi, Housing Case Manager, Plymouth Housing Group
Liz Rapuzzi has worked in direct service with people experiencing homelessness and low income communities in Western Washington for 11 years with a focus on shelter and housing. Her current work projects include bringing trauma informed care to the workplace and advocating for participant voice in housing programs.

Jennifer Romich, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Washington, School of Social Work
Associate Professor Jennie Romich studies resources and economics in families with a particular emphasis on low income workers, household budgets, and families’ interactions with public policy. Her recent poverty-related projects include ongoing research into effective marginal tax rates created by means-tested benefit schedules and the tax system, a study of the effects of highway tolls on low income households, research into financial services used by low income consumers, and a mixed-methods investigation of income of families involved with the child welfare system.
At the University of Washington, Romich is a founding affiliate of the West Coast Poverty Center and an active member of the Center for Studies of Demography and Ecology. She teaches policy and policy practice classes. Romich holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in economics and earned a doctorate in human development and social policy from Northwestern University.

 

B20: Where Rubber Meets The Road: Integration Of Housing, Health Care, And Cost-Effective Outcomes  
Health care providers have a golden opportunity to take advantage of the new supportive housing benefit in Washington state for our most medically fragile homeless patients. This presentation shows how one Community Health Center improves the health of its patients by integrating supportive housing as part of its PCMH model of care.

Presentation Slides from Rhonda Hauff

Speakers:
Rhonda Hauff, MSW, COO/Deputy CEO, Yakima Neighborhood Health Services
Rhonda Hauff is the Chief Operating Officer/Deputy CEO of Yakima Neighborhood Health Services, and has been with YNHS since 1983. Ms. Hauff is past chair of the Health Care for Homeless Committee, current chair of the Health Care in Public Housing Committee for the National Association of Community Health Centers, and serves on several local partnerships to coordinate access and services for underserved populations. She also serves on Washington State’s Health Benefits Exchange’s Navigator Technical Advisory Committee. Ms. Hauff is a graduate of George Washington University’s Master Certificate program in Community Health Center Management, holds a Master of Social Work in Psychology/Social Work at Pacific Lutheran University (Washington State), and a Bachelors of Art in Community Health Education (Washington State). 

Annette Rodriguez, Housing and HCH Services Director, Yakima Neighborhood Health Services                                        
Annette Rodriguez is the Outreach, Housing, and Health Care for the Homeless Coordinator for Yakima Neighborhood Health Services, and has been with YNHS since 1991. In her current position, she oversees the Health Care for the Homeless Program, Transitional and Permanent Supportive Housing, Homeless Respite Care, four Washington Families Fund programs providing self-sufficiency support to moderate and high need formerly homeless families, a supportive housing program for Youth and Youth Adults, and Yakima’s only LGBTQ Youth Resource Service Center. At “The Depot”, Yakima County’s Homeless Resource Center, Annette and her staff also coordinate HEN, CHG, and ESG services with partners in the Homeless Network of Yakima County. The YNHS Outreach team provides services in local shelters, housing projects, and in coordination with other services. Her staff are certified Patient Navigators, or “In Person Assisters” to help clients enroll in Washington Apple Health at the same time as applying for other housing and benefits. Annette is particularly effective in her position because of her ability to see the “big picture” of Yakima’s resource community, and she knows how to maneuver the system to get services to clients efficiently – especially clients with many pressing needs.

 

Conference Boosters

Wednesday

7:00am-8:15am 
Conference Orientation Breakfast
If you've experienced homelessness or live in affordable housing, you're invited to join a conference orientation breakfast to connect with other attendees and get questions answered about the conference activities and logistics. First-time attendees with these experiences are especially encouraged to stop by during this time. Emerging Advocates Program and Resident Action Project staff and leaders will be on hand to greet you and help you prepare for a great conference experience.

9:20am-10:50am
Master Leasing Training

Join Mike Parker and staff from the Opportunity Council for a discussion about master leasing in scattered site apartments. Other presenters include: Tom Day and Kristin Hill.

11:10am - 12:25pm
Downtowners Film Screening

Downtowners, directed and produced by Jessica Eskelson and Cole Ketcherside, shares the voices of young people who are homeless in Olympia, Washington as they explore issues such as sexual violence, public space, gender roles, street culture, and community perceptions. These voices inspire a connection and understanding seldom experienced by those who lack direct experience with the streets.

City And County Medicaid Benefit Implementation Meeting
This meeting will discuss opportunities, challenges, and ideas for how local governments can support providers in implementing the state’s Medicaid Transformation Demonstration, including the supportive housing and supported employment service benefits. Participants are encouraged to attend Session A1 to hear the latest implementation update from the state.

Medicaid Transformation Demonstration Home Page
Initiative 1 Information (Accountable Communities of Health)
Initiative 3 Information (Supportive Housing and Supported Employment)
 

2:00pm-3:30pm
Act It Out: Theater For Change
This session will use Forum Theater, a creative process where the line between audience and actors is hazy, to open up dialogue, advance understanding, and explore real life solutions to issues faced by those experiencing poverty and/or homelessness. Led by Matthew Anderson with the Seattle Housing Authority Resident Leadership Development Team, attendees will have the opportunity to observe and engage in this social justice tool.

Calling All Movement Leaders: Past, Present, And Future 
Have you served on the board of the Housing Alliance or the Washington State Coalition for the Homeless? Or, have you thought about translating your passion for ending homelessness into a leadership role at the Housing Alliance? Join current, past, and, hopefully, future leaders for an informal meet and greet and a chance to learn about the many opportunities to get more involved in our statewide movement. Refreshments will be provided. 

3:50pm–5:05pm
Looking for Functional Zero Film Screening 
Looking for Functional Zero is part of Homeless in Bellingham, an episodic web series produced by Fredrick Dent and Lisa Spicer for the Opportunity Council in partnership with Whatcom's Homeless Coalition. This new episode is the series' first feature length (50 minutes) installment. Rich in content and deeply emotional, the series is designed to inform citizens and policy makers about homelessness.

Go Fund Me: Homeless in Bellingham Film Project
Check out the Homeless in Bellingham series
Link to film coming soon.

Overdose Response And Naloxone Training
Join Alison Newman with the University of Washington’s Center for Opioid Safety Education to learn how to recognize and respond to an opioid overdose. This training will include information about risks for overdose, symptoms of overdose, and how to use naloxone, the opioid overdose antidote.

 

Thursday

7:30am-8:45am
Been There Breakfast 

This informal breakfast meeting is a chance for conference attendees who’ve experienced homelessness to come together for mutual support and networking. This breakfast will be a caucus space; only attendees with this shared experience, please. Hosted by Shelby Helle, EAP graduate and Housing Alliance Program Assistant.

PATH Breakfast
Join this informal breakfast conversation to meet fellow conference attendees who work with the Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) program. This will be a great opportunity to learn about developments in communities across the state and meet people engaged in similar work across Washington.

Shelter Provider Network Breakfast 
The Shelter Provider Network is a learning community of shelter providers from across Washington who have been convening monthly to share best practices and brainstorm around challenges. Network participants are invited to enjoy an informal breakfast get-together to meet one another, network, and reflect on the impact of the Network on your work.

10:00am - 12:00pm
Community Acupuncture 
 
Acupuncturist Rebekah Demirel, LAc, RAc, MPCC with Trauma Integration Programs, is offering community acupuncture sessions. Enjoy an acupuncture treatment and take the time to unwind and let your nervous system get some much deserved rest and relaxation. Payment is on a slide scale from $20 to $40. You can learn more about Rebekah at http://www.traumaprograms.com.

10:50am - 12:20pm
Housing And Essential Needs (HEN) Provider Meeting

HEN grantees, sub-grantees, managers, and staff are invited to discuss program administration and advocacy best practices. Program design analysis will be discussed along with trends and implementation challenges from across the state. Come share your ideas and network with peers across county lines.

2:00pm-3:30pm
Passing a Housing Levy In Your Community

Are you frustrated with the lack of affordable housing in your community? Join this meeting to learn what communities across the state are doing to expand access to affordable housing by passing local housing levies. Rachael Myers and Teresa Clark with the Housing Alliance, Michael Anderson with the Center for Community Change, Andy Silver with Council for the Homeless, and Greg Winter with Opportunity Council will discuss how to organize a campaign in your community.

Presentation Slides

Community Acupuncture  
Acupuncturist Rebekah Demirel, LAc, RAc, MPCC with Trauma Integration Programs, is offering community acupuncture sessions. Enjoy an acupuncture treatment and take the time to unwind and let your nervous system get some much deserved rest and relaxation. Payment is on a slide scale from $20 to $40. You can learn more about Rebekah at http://www.traumaprograms.com.

3:45pm-4:45pm
Conference Debrief Meeting for EAP/RAP Members 

This meeting will be a chance to discuss takeaways from the conference, network with other advocates working from a place of personal experience, and discuss what’s next for our programs, as a group and as individual advocates.